Hameray Classroom Literacy Blog!

Zoozoo Storytellers Activities!

Posted by Cindy Price on Nov 29, 2016 2:58:00 PM

This is a guest blog post by Cindy Price, a first-grade teacher from Delaware. If you like what you read here, take a look at her blog at Mrs. Price's Kindergators, and be sure to check back here for more of her guest blog posts!

I love the Zoozoo Storytellers series! In first grade we are comparing fiction and nonfiction books as well as learning about retelling a fiction story and the importance of making sure the text and photographs match in a nonfiction text. The series is perfect for this comparison.

The books we read were Frogs and Frog’s Play. As usual, we began by reviewing the vocabulary. These books have such an awesome vocabulary bank. The text was perfect for my small-group and my low readers, but all of my kids gravitate towards these books! The one thing I love about these books is the fact that they increase my students’ self-esteem. The easy-to-read yet informative text was a hit with my kids!

We can use these books for many Common Core Standards. We can use them for point of view, opinion writing, compare and contrast stories, text to self connections, listening and speaking standards, as well as reading fluency and writing activities! 

The nonfiction book, Frogs, had awesome photos that closely match the text. This is an important feature for the books to have, especially at this reading level.

Here is the cover and some pages from the nonfiction book!

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Here are some of the things my kids did with the nonfiction text!

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We read the book and discussed the parts of a frog. Then they labeled the frog with the word bank at the bottom of the page. We also compared ourselves to the frog. What body parts do we share with frogs?

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We also talked about what frogs "can" do, what they "have," and what they "are." We made a large class chart as well as the children making their own individual chart to share with their families.

Then we read the fiction book Frog’s Play. My kids loved the bright pictures and the easy-to-read text. We read it once as a class and then they read it individually. All of my readers loved this book despite their reading level. I also put it in our class library and it has been a constant hit!

Check out the cute pictures and easy print as well as some of the activities we did using this book!

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After reading, we retold the story. First we retold it with a friend, then as a class. Then, depending on their abilities, the kids either wrote what happened or drew pictures for what happened in the story!

Then we did this fill-in activity.

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When we were finished reading both books, we also compared the two texts. The kids loved this entire mini-unit.

~~~

Click on the image below to learn more about the Zoozoo Storytellers Series that is featured in this post.New Call-to-Action

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Topics: Leveled Readers, Zoozoo Storytellers, Nonfiction, First Grade, Cindy Price

Driving Into Word Study

Posted by Marcy Godesa on Nov 15, 2016 3:51:00 PM

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This is a guest blog post by Marcy Godesa, a first-grade teacher from Oregon who blogs over at Searching for Teacher Balance. If you like what you read here, be sure to check back here for more of her guest blog posts! 

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Word Study is one of my favorite times of the day. It is that beautiful point in the day when I get to watch my students learn new words right in front of my eyes. My kiddos are excellent at using their good reading habits to work through new words, but explicit teaching of new vocabulary, on my part, is still extremely important.

I love taking my kiddos' leveled readers and pulling specific vocabulary to not only support that current book, but to support their development of background knowledge. Hameray Publishing came to the rescue yet again with their amazing books. Big Wheels at Work has been the perfect addition to my readers' book bags. 

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During our sneak peek of the book, we explored the tricky words. Throughout our small group, kiddos matched the "stretched out sounds" (word attack strategy) of each word to the correct spelling of the word. They placed the cards in the different parking spots as they matched them up. This activity allowed my students to use the visual representation of the sounds to practice each word.

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Students then drove their monster trucks into the parking spots of each tricky word found throughout the book. They loved being able to "drive" into each word, thus practicing each word again.  

You can grab this parking lot and sound matching cards here.  

As you can see, I love working on words with my kiddos. Do you love working on words with your students? What is your favorite time of day teaching your students?

 ~~~

Click the image below to read about the Kaleidoscope Collection, which includes Big Wheels At Work.

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Topics: Leveled Readers, Kaleidoscope Collection, Vocabulary, Marcy Godesa

Election Vocabulary with the Biography Series

Posted by Sally Hosokawa on Nov 3, 2016 3:01:00 PM

 

In just five days, American voters will elect the 45th President of the United States. Everywhere we turn, the media bombards us with the latest campaign news, polls, and political advertisements. Our students also want to take part in the fervent discussions taking over our country, but they are still too young to actually cast a ballot.

Especially in this year’s controversial election, discussing politics in the classroom is complicated by the need to respect the different beliefs of all students and their families. How can you, as an educator, healthily and productively teach students the knowledge needed to become responsible citizens?

A great way to address the current campaign in the classroom is to turn back into history. The Hameray Biography Series features the stories of three American presidents: George Washington, Ronald Reagan, and Barack Obama. Reading past and current presidents’ stories will circumvent heated debates about the 2016 candidates while still providing students the opportunity to learn about the U.S. Presidential election. 

Barack Obama and Ronald Reagan’s biographies devote multiple chapters to their presidential campaign. Each book also includes a glossary that allows students to familiarize themselves with this informational text feature.

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Using the glossary and relevant chapters in the book, ask students to create a list of election vocabulary and their definitions. Underneath each word, have them write examples about how the vocabulary word relates to Barack Obama and Ronald Reagan.

Example: Campaign- the competition between political candidates.

Ronald Reagan talked about the danger of the Soviet Union during his campaign.

Barack Obama began his campaign in February 2007.

 

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This exercise will help students draw connections between two historical figures through specific information in the text (CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.3). The two biographies also include the following election vocabulary words:

Candidacy

Conservative

Concession speech

Convention

Debate

Democrat

Election

Liberal

Nominate

Opponent

Republican

Vice President

 

 

In a follow-up class discussion, ask your students about the current election using their newly learned vocabulary: Who are the candidates? When is Election Day this year?

Encourage your students to watch the news with their family on November 8th. They’ll appreciate how classroom literacy directly relates to important current events happening in the country! 

~~~

Click the image below to download the Teacher's Guide for Ronald Reagan and for Barack Obama.

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Topics: Leveled Readers, Biography Series, Social Studies, Election

Halloween Pretend Play

Posted by Sally Hosokawa on Oct 13, 2016 3:44:00 PM

Halloween is only 18 days away! Children love this spooky holiday for its Jack-O’-Lantern carving and candy-filled surprises. However, arguably the most exciting aspect of Halloween is dressing up in costumes. Are your students already buzzing about which costume they’ll be wearing on Halloween? 

Holidays provide ample opportunity to tie seasonal events into literacy lessons. For emergent readers, however, incorporating seasonal books can pose a challenge—“Jack-O’-Lantern,” “werewolf,” and even “Halloween” will stump early readers. Pretending from the My World Series solves this problem by discussing the fun of dressing up in language that all your students can access!

 Although leveled at Guided Reading Level E, Pretending maintains an identical sentence structure throughout most of the book: “We can ____.” The repetitive structure will help your emergent reader gain confidence with each page. In a shared reading setting, encourage your students to help you read “We can” on each page. Real-world photographs also accompany each sentence in the book, allowing students to use pictorial clues to understand the text (CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.K.7).

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The sentence structure only breaks on the last page where the text asks two questions. With the confidence that your students have built in the first eleven pages, they will be ready and willing to tackle this new sentence structure. 

During the lesson, ask your students the following questions:

Before reading:

  • Has anyone already decided on a costume for Halloween? Start a list on the board of costumes of your students’ costumes.
  • What does "pretending" mean? How do you pretend? How is dressing up on Halloween a type of pretending?

During reading:

  • Add the different pretending ideas presented in the book to your list (cooks, shoppers, dancers, etc.)

After reading:

  • What other dress-up ideas can we add to this list? Many children may have already decided on their costume, but this list may provide inspiration for those who haven’t chosen their costume yet.

 

When discussing Halloween costumes, make sure to stay mindful that not all students’ families can afford to purchase a costume. Simple dress-up ideas such as a farmer, a teacher, or a cat can easily be put together with clothing at home. If you have any economically-friendly costume ideas for students and teachers alike, share them in the comments below!

~~~

Learn more about Pretending at this product page--it's not too late to order now and receive your books before Halloween! Click the image below to download a informational sheet about the My World Series, which includes the book featured in this article. 

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Topics: Early Childhood, Leveled Readers, My World, Halloween

Double Consonants with Little Rabbit!

Posted by Sally Hosokawa on Oct 6, 2016 3:02:00 PM

 

Have you read Joy Cowley’s Little Rabbit series yet? Leveled from C-D, this all-new set from the Joy Cowley Early Birds series will bring joy and laughter into your early childhood classroom.

Apart from the charming humor and adorable illustrations, the Little Rabbit series offers a multitude of opportunities for your students to improve literacy skills. The main character’s name, Little Rabbit, already includes two examples of double consonants--"tt" and "bb"! By examining the book Carrots, your students can familiarize themselves with double consonants, an essential phonic skill.

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Title page:

  • Examine the title. What do you notice about the spelling of this word? Are there any letters that are repeated in the word?
  • Introduce the term double consonants—when two of the same consonants appear together in succession.

 P. 2:

  • What are the double consonant words on this page? (Rabbit, chopped, carrot.)
  • Three is not a double consonant because “e” is a vowel. This exercise will serve as an effective way to test your students’ confidence in distinguishing consonants from vowels.

P. 5:

  • What is the new double consonant word introduced on this page? (All.)

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P. 6:

  • What are the new double consonant words introduced on this page? (Squirrel, will.)

P. 8:

  • Explain that Dad is not a double consonant word. While it contains two “d”s in the word, they are separated by an “a” and thus do not appear right next to each other.

After reading: 

  • List all the different consonants that appear doubled in this book: r, t, b, l, and p. Brainstorm with the class to think of other words that contain these double letter consonants (parrot, tattle, bubble, gorilla, happy).
  • Can other consonants in the alphabet also be doubled? Have your students go on a double consonant hunt through the other books in your classroom library. The Little Rabbit series also includes the double consonan words biggest and off. “S” as in miss, “m” as in summer, “d” as in shudder, and “n” as in runner also appear as double consonants in English.

 

Double consonants can challenge early spellers, but they are actually very common in our daily language. (For reference, this blog post uses 31 different instances of double consonants!) Gaining familiarity through reading will help your students recognize words that require double consonants. Happy reading with Little Rabbit!

~~~

Browse all of the Little Rabbit titles at our website here. Click the image below to download a informational sheet about Joy Cowley Early Birds, which includes the book featured in this article. 

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Topics: Joy Cowley Early Birds, Leveled Readers, Double Consonants, Little Rabbit

Establishing Buddy Reading Expectations

Posted by Marcy Godesa on Oct 4, 2016 3:10:00 PM

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This is a guest blog post by Marcy Godesa, a first-grade teacher from Oregon who blogs over at Searching for Teacher Balance. If you like what you read here, check her blog out, and be sure to check back here for more of her guest blog posts!

Setting clear expectations beginning on the first day of school is vital. The amount of time we practice routines in my classroom may seem crazy to some people, but it is the only way to ensure a successful school year. One area that I spend a lot of time practicing with my students around is buddy reading. I have learned never to expect that my students know how to do something—they need to be taught. This doesn't just apply to primary age students, but all students. As teachers, we sometimes expect kids to just know or remember from the pervious year and that does not always work on our favor. Therefore, day by day, we practice one expectation and add another as mastery of the previous is shown.

Here are the buddy expectations that we have been working on. We practiced one a day, adding to our expectations over the first few weeks of school.

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I have learned over the last 12 years that it is important for buddy readers to not only be able to meet the expectations set, but to be able to communicate on the same level. I have searched high and low for great books that buddies can build their background knowledge with, and then discuss further through a buddy read. My search for great books is finally over! The Fables and Real Word Series from Hameray Publishing fits all of my buddy reading needs.

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This series allows my kiddos to read and build their background knowledge with the nonfiction books. They can read them independently during Read-to-Self or with their buddy.

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Students then have common vocabulary and topic background knowledge to make connections, retell, find their favorite parts, and just book talk. The nonfiction books are just the beginning. Each nonfiction set has a fable that relates to the topic. Buddies are able to read the fables together, building off their nonfiction reading.

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I love sitting and listening in on buddy reads. It is such a wonderful opportunity to hear students talking about books. I have noticed that by reading books sets and series together they are able to make connections through the conversations they have. Buddies are also so excited to share interesting excerpts with each other. 
Buddy Reading has become a successful time in my classroom. I firmly believe that setting and reviewing exceptions is key, but having meaningful text is the icing on the cake.

What is a Buddy Reading MUST in your classroom?

~~~

Want to learn more about nonfiction books shown in this post? Click the image below to read about the Fables and the Real World series.

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Topics: Leveled Readers, Group Work, Fables and the Real World, Marcy Godesa

Reading to Develop Emotional Literacy: Afraid

Posted by Sally Hosokawa on Sep 29, 2016 3:29:00 PM

This is the fifth and last post in a series about reading narrative books to develop emotional literacy. For the first post (introduction), click here. Click the links for the second (happy), third (sad), and fourth post (angry).

AFRAID

This weekly blog series discusses how reading narrative books helps students develop both emotional and literary skills. Today's post will focus on the fifth and last basic human emotion: fear. Since Halloween is only a month away, a discussion about fear will help students prepare for this spooky event!

The Man Who Was Afraid of Ants from the Kaleidoscope Collection features Jake, a firefighter who abhors ants. With an adult as the protagonist of the book, students can realize that everyone, even adults and community helpers, all feel scared sometimes. The book's subtle narration will provide an appropriate challenge for your students to utilize the emotional and literacy skills they have developed over the past 5 weeks. 

 

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THE MAN WHO WAS AFRAID OF ANTS

Discussion points:

p. 2:

  • Look at the illustration of Jake. What words would you use to describe him? How do you think he is feeling?
p. 3:
  • Does Jake look different in this illustration? How do you think he is feeling now?
  • How does Jake act when he is afraid? (His nose itches, his finger twitches, he gets a creepy feeling)
  • As a class, brainstorm other reactions that your students have when they are afraid (sweating, butterflies in the stomach, faster heartbeat).
  • Many of your students may laugh when they see Jake’s scared face. Remind your students that what might not be scary for one person might be for another, so it’s impolite to laugh at someone’s fears or call them a scaredy-cat.
p. 7:
  • Why did Jake leave the picnic?
p. 8-12:
  • How did Jake overcome his fear of ants?
  • Why do you think Jake was afraid of ants? This question requires children to empathize with the character and brainstorm possible origins of a fear.
  • In pairs, have students discuss their own fears. Identifying and putting fears into words will help students feel agency over them. If your students are feeling shy, share one of your fears with the class. Recognizing that they aren’t alone in their scared feelings will encourage students to speak up. 

Writing exercise:

  • Have students complete the sentence “I am scared of ___.” and draw an accompanying picture. Again, illustrating allows students to feel more powerful over the fear.

Today's post concludes this blog series on simultaneously developing emotional and literacy skills. What are other ways that you teach emotional skills through reading? Which emotions would you like to see featured in the future? Let us know in the comments below!

~~~

Click this link to browse all of our products about Feelings and Emotions. Click the image below to download a informational sheet about the Kaleidoscope Collection, which includes the book featured in this article. 

Kaleidoscope Collection Info Sheet

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Topics: Leveled Readers, Kaleidoscope Collection, Sally Hosokawa, Emotional Literacy

Book Introductions With Guided Reading Groups, Part 3

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Sep 27, 2016 3:45:00 PM

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This is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. It is the third and last post in a series about utilizing book introductions to help guided reading groups develop their reading strategies. To read the first post (introduction), click here. To read the second post, click here.

This blog series focuses on the importance of book introductions in guided reading groups. Today, I will conclude this series by examining a Level I book, The Ungrateful Tiger, and provide an opportunity for teacher reflection after giving a book introduction to guided reading groups.

BOOK THREE: THE UNGRATEFUL TIGER

Series: Fables and the Real World. Guided Reading Level: I (i). Genre: Fable.

PREPARATION:

  • You might want to remind the children of the definition of a fable.
  • The word "ungrateful" has both a prefix and a suffix. The multi-meaning word 'fair' is also a key word throughout the story and the group needs to understand what it means in the story.

 

INTRODUCTION:

  • Distribute the books. Ask the children to notice the word in green at the top of the front cover. Remind them of a fable that you know they are familiar with and how it teaches a lesson. Explain that this book does the same thing.
  • Read the title to the children. Ask them to frame the first and last syllables and find that 'un' means 'not' and 'ful' means 'full.’ They can predict that 'ungrateful' means 'not being full of thanks.’
  • Ask the children to study the pictures and meet the main characters in the story (the boy, the tiger, and the owl).
  • Ask the children to turn to page 8 and study the picture and frame the word 'pounced.’ How does the picture help them determine the meaning of 'pounced’? Remind them that the pictures can provide clues for meaning as they read the story.
  • Remind the students that they should think about this fable’s lesson while they read. Who learned the lesson? Remember to discuss this question after the first reading.

FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES:

  • After the first reading, a second reading could be done as a reader's theater. The teacher can be the narrator and students read the conversations of the men, the tiger, and the owl. This reading can demonstrate knowledge of traits and emotions of the characters.
  • The book also is a good tool for discussing cause and effect. Why did the men dig the pit? Why did the tiger cry for help? Why did the boy help the tiger out of the pit? What happened because the boy got the tiger out of the pit? Why did the owl know what was happening between the boy and the tiger?
  • You can read another fable to the children or provide fables that they can read with 95 percent accuracy or better. Children can also share a fable they read in the past and why it was a fable.

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SOME CLOSING THOUGHTS FOR TEACHER AFTER THE FIRST READING

  • Do you think your introduction helped the children more fluently use a strategy they are developing or use a new strategy for the first time?
  • Was the reading rate appropriate?
  • Did the children exhibit some feelings or facial and vocal emotions that demonstrated their understanding of character emotions? Did they use the punctuation marks as clues to understanding the character traits and feelings?
  • Did the students demonstrate a need for a reading strategy that you didn’t introduce? Think about that strategy as you plan the introduction of the next book.
  • Remember that multiple readings of a book are important. The students can reread the book at home. The book can be placed in the class library for even more readings. Help your parents understand the importance of the re-readings.

As you use carefully planned book introductions, you will find your readers improving their use of strategies and becoming more independent readers. Selecting just the right book and identifying what support the group needs to read a new book will help students improve their reading strategies, fluency, and reading rate.

~~~

Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from our Kaleidoscope Collection. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children. 

~~~

Click the left image below to download an information sheet with key features about Fables and the Real World, which contains the book featured in this article.

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Topics: Leveled Readers, Geraldine Haggard, Guided Reading, Fables and the Real World, Book Introductions

Reading to Develop Emotional Literacy: Angry

Posted by Sally Hosokawa on Sep 22, 2016 3:43:00 PM

This is the fourth post in a series about reading narrative books to develop emotional literacy. For the first post (introduction), click here. You can also read the second post about "happy" here and the third post about "sad" here.

ANGER

This weekly blog series discusses how narrative books help students develop emotional and literary skills. Today, we will focus on the emotion of anger. No matter the reason, every child feels angry sometimes. Recognizing this emotion and describing it with words is a crucial part of anger management. Reading about a fight from an omniscient point of view will also help students understand the different emotions of each character.

In The Letter Fight, part of the Joy Cowley Early Birds series, the characters all claim that they are the smartest. By examining the ways in which each letter expresses its anger, you can teach a lesson about healthy and effective ways to expres anger. Students can also practice their spelling skills while reading this book!

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THE LETTER FIGHT

p. 1:

  • What does it mean to fight? Why do you think the letters are fighting?

p .4:

  • Why do you think A kicks L? Is that a good way to show your anger? How do you think L feels about being kicked?
  • With what betters ways can you tell someone that they are making you angry? (With your words.)
  • Instead of kicking, what else can you do to release your angry energy? (Drawing, dancing, playing ball)
p. 9:
  • Do you think the other letters like A’s plan? How can you tell?
p. 10:
  • Which “talking” verbs show you that the letters are angry? (“Growled” and “shouted”)
p. 12–13:
  • Examine the illustrations. How can you tell that the letters are angry? (Open mouth, slanted eyebrows, narrowed eyes)
p. 15:
  • The letters feel better after sleeping. What are other activities that can calm your anger? (Playing with a favorite toy, singing a song)
p. 16:
  • How did the letters solve their fight?

Reader's Theater:

  • Select students to read the lines of P, A, L and S. Remind them to adopt a voice that reflects each letter's emotion (i.e., angry). This dramatic play will allow your students to experience each character's feelings on a deeper level. 

Numbers Exercise:

  • Teach your students that simply counting to six can help them calm angry feelings. Give each student a piece of blank paper. Fold it to make six boxes. Have students number the boxes in order. If desired, students can illustrate each box to show a progression from anger to contentment. Practice using the counting chart as a class, pointing to each box as you count aloud. If a student is ever feeling angry in the future, encourage him or her to use their counting chart.

Reading about fictional fights will not only improve students' reading skills, but it will also serve as a classroom management tool if there is a conflict between classmates. Next week, we will focus on how books about being afraid. Subscribe on the right-hand sidebar to receive e-mail updates about new blog posts! 

~~~

Click this link to browse all of our products about Feelings and Emotions. Click the image below to download a informational sheet about Joy Cowley Early Birds, which includes the book featured in this article. 

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Topics: Joy Cowley Early Birds, Leveled Readers, Sally Hosokawa, Emotional Literacy

Book Introductions With Guided Reading Groups, Part 2

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Sep 20, 2016 2:50:00 PM

GHaggardbiopic

This is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. It is the second in a series about utilizing book introductions to help guided reading groups develop their reading strategies. To read the first post, click here.

The first blog in this series included reasons to use book introductions in a guided reading group setting. I also included hints for selection of a “just right book” and tips on teacher preparation for the introduction. Today's blog shares examples of effective book introductions for two differently-leveled Hameray titles: Buddy Boy and His Skateboard and Dragon's Friend.

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BOOK ONE: BUDDY BOY AND HIS SKATEBOARD

Series: Kaleidoscope Collection. Guided reading level: E. Genre: Narrative.

PREPARATION:

Imagine that your guided reading groups includes children who were not reading with fluency. As you read Buddy Boy and His Skateboard, you feel that the quotations in the book could be used to help children read more fluently and recognize the use of the quotation marks.

There are three compound words in the story: 'someone,' 'skateboard,' and 'grandma.' You predict that the children can use the pictures and meaning cues to determine the two latter words, but you decide to introduce the word 'someone' in your introduction.

BOOK INTRODUCTION:

  • Distribute the books. Ask the children to study the cover and meet Buddy Boy. Where is he? How do you think he feels about the skateboard? As we read the story we will discover how he enjoys the skateboard, and how something sad almost happens to him.
  • Ask the children to look through the pictures and decide who the other characters in the book are.
  • Use page 3 to introduce the quotation marks. Model what Mom said with expression and ask the children to read the two lines of conversation with you. Remind them to read all the quotations in the story in that way. You might emphasize the word 'Please.’
  • Now we are ready to read and find out what happens to Buddy Boy and his skateboard.
  • Watch and listen as the children do the first reading of the book. Did they read with fluency?

FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES

Follow up the reading with these discussion questions:

  • Why does Buddy Boy have the skateboard in bed with him?
  • What lesson do you think Buddy Boy learned?
  • Why do you think his dad threatened to take his skateboard?

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BOOK TWO: DRAGON'S FRIEND

Series: Joy Cowley Early Birds. Guided Reading Level: G. Genre: Narrative.

PREPARATION:

Three notable punctuation marks appear in the book. The apostrophes make the word a possessive. The quotation and exclamation marks can help students read with greater fluency and expression and understand the characters’ emotions.

Multiple-meaning words also appear in the book. Page 2 introduces the word 'poor.’ Page 10 introduces the word 'scales.' The picture on the two pages can help the children understand the meanings of these words. The word 'cared' on page 14 is important to help the students understand why the dragon decides he has friends.

INTRODUCTION:

  • Distribute the books. Ask the children to study the front cover. Read the title with the children. Why do you think the dragon is crying? How many dragons are in the picture? Why does the word “Dragon's” contain an apostrophe? Explain its meaning.
  • Use the title page to meet the other characters in the story. Where might they be? Why are they looking down? What do you think they may find?
  • Ask the children to read the first line on page 2. Encourage them to use the picture and discuss the idea of the dragon being 'poor.' Go to page 14 and use the double picture to discover the meaning of the word 'cared.' The readers need to understand why the children helped the dragon.
  • Ask the children to find some quotation marks and review why they are there. Do the same thing with an exclamation mark.
  • Invite the children to read and discover how the dragon's problem was solved.

FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES:

In addition to the follow-up activities below, the back cover of Dragon’s Friend has some excellent After Reading suggestions.

  • Do you think Joy Cowley gave the book a good title? Can you find another possible title on page 16? This will require the use of the understanding of the apostrophe.
  • Invite each child to write about a time that someone cared for him/her and helped solve a problem. Remind them that some of the words and spellings they need to use can be found in the book. The writings could be illustrated and compiled into a book for the classroom library.

Next week, I will conclude this blog series by examining one last book and offering tips for teacher reflection after the guided reading group meeting.

~~~

Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from our Kaleidoscope Collection. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children. 

~~~

Click the left image below to download an information sheet with key features about the Kaleidoscope Collection, which contains Buddy Boy and His Skateboard and books written by Geraldine Haggard. Click the rigth image below to download an information sheet about Joy Cowley Early Birds, which contains Dragon's Friend.

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Topics: Joy Cowley Early Birds, Leveled Readers, Kaleidoscope Collection, Geraldine Haggard, Guided Reading, Book Introductions

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