Hameray Classroom Literacy Blog!

A Digraph Scavenger Hunt with Fables and the Real World

Posted by Sally Hosokawa on Aug 30, 2016 3:30:00 PM

The Fables and the Real World series pairs narrative and informational texts together to help students make connections between fiction and reality. This series isn’t just created for teaching valuable life lessons, however. It also serves as a valuable resource for developing foundational literacy skills.

By Grade 1, the Common Core State Standards require that students “know the spelling-sound correspondences for common consonant digraphs” (CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.1.3.A) Digraphs, where a combination of two letters represents one sound, occur frequently throughout the English language. However, early readers can easily mix up the sounds of similar digraphs. The downloadable Fables and the Real World Teacher’s Guide lists different digraphs to focus on in each book, perfect to use for a digraph scavenger hunt with your students! The Teacher’s Guide also offers various exercises to teach digraphs:


fables-real-world-marvelous-milk-book.jpg

CONSONANT DIGRAPHS

 Nets for Work and Play (from the Dove King set)

  1. Have children identify words in this book with consonant digraphs: there, catch(ing), things, sh, ships, trucks, with, something, they, beaches, sharks, other, throw, through, stick, kick.
  2. Write the words on the board and ask children to take turns circling the letters that make the consonant digraphs.

animals-are-clever-cover.jpeg

Marvelous Milk (from the Milkmaid and her Pail set)

  1. Have children identify words in the book with consonant digraphs: where, what, there, things, with, cheese, pudding, milkshakes, whipped, chocolate, chip, healthy.
  2. Together, brainstorm words with consonant digraphs. Then have children use the words to make up rhymes.

Sun and Wind Energy (from the North Wind and the Sun set)

  1. Have children identify words with consonant digraphs wh, th, sh, ph, tch, ck, ng. Ask them to write the words and circle the digraphs.
  2. Create a chart with digraphs (including ch) as heads. Have children brainstorm words they know with these digraphs.

Turtle or Tortoise? (from the Tortoise and the Rabbit set)

  1. Have children find words in the book that use consonant digraphs wh, ch, th, sh. Ask where they can be found in words.

Animals are Clever (from The Fox and the Goat set)

  1. Help children identify words in this book with consonant digraphs th, sh, wh, ch, ck, tch, ng, ph.

 

VOWEL DIGRAPHS

seeds-cover.jpgSeeds (from the Dove King set)

  1. Have children find words in the book with final silent e as well as long vowel digraphs: seed(s), inside, waiting, three, goes, rain, sunshine, tree, eat.
  2. Have children sort the words by their vowel sounds, and then sort them by their vowel combinations.

The Tortoise and the Rabbit

  1. Have children find words in the book with final silent e as well as long vowel digraphs: time, race, see, each, ate, tie, shoes, came, eat(ing), take, woke, line.
  2. As children read other books today, have them look for words with final silent e and words with long vowel sounds made by using common vowel combinations.

The Donkey and His Driver

  1. Help children identify words in this book with vowel digraphs: donkey, mountain, road, looked, below, see, straight, slow, stay, head, tail, hay, instead.
  1. Help children identify words in other books that use the vowel digraphs contained in this book.

 

Going on a scavenger hunt through the Fables and the Real World series is a great way to learn how to distinguish both vowel and consonant digraphs. You can download the complete Teacher’s Guide for free at the bottom of this post.

What are other clever ways that you use the Fables and the Real World series to teach literacy skills to your students? Let us know in the comments below!

~~~

Click here to download a Fables and the Real World Teacher's Guide for FREE! Click the image below to download an information sheet about the Fables and the Real World series. 

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Topics: Leveled Readers, Digraphs, Grade One, Fables and the Real World

[New Post] Using Language Arts to Meet Social Studies Standards in Grade One: Part 4

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Jan 21, 2016 3:30:00 PM

GHaggardbiopicThis is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children.

This is the last post in a four-part series. You can see the first post here, the second post here, and the third post here.

The purpose of this series of blog posts is threefold: sharing the importance of the social studies standards, explaining how to combine the uses of the Language Arts and Social Studies in the first grade, and sharing ways to use Language Arts Standards and leveled books to deliver social studies expectations centered around homes. Specific books will be keyed to specific social studies standards as examples.

Use of Leveled Books to Deliver Social Studies Expectations for Grade One

I am listing (in alphabetical order) six examples of books appropriate for incorporating language arts standards with social studies expectations in grade one, along with suggestions for language arts activities. The first three were listed in the third post in the series, and the second three are below. If you’d like to use these ideas as lesson plans for these books, I’ve linked to where you can buy the books, but you can also use these suggestions as guidelines to apply to any similar books you might already have on hand.

my_big_sister_400.jpg4) My Big Sister by Teri Horner

Expectations:

  • Families have rules and expectations
  • Families help each other
  • Families are kind and considerate of each other
  • Families differ in size
  • Understanding what a family is

Lesson suggestions:

  • Vocabulary to be developed can include 'patience,' 'sharing,' 'helping,' 'younger,' 'older,' 'selfish,' ‘kindness,' 'considerate.'
  • Prepare for the sharing of the book by making a list on the board of students in the following family categories: ONLY CHILD, TWO CHILDREN, THREE CHILDREN, MORE THAN THREE CHILDREN. Provide time for the children to study the lists. They can then share the thoughts that come to them. Some families have more children than other families. Invite them to share good things about having siblings. If they have siblings, they may also discuss problems they have with them.
  • After this activity tell them that you are going to share a story about two sisters. Ask them to listen carefully and be ready to talk about how each sister in the story feels about her sister. Share the front cover using an opaque projector if possible and introduce the sisters. Read the story slowly and display the pictures as you read each page. Provide opportunities for the children to make comments.
  • The following questions can guide the discussion: "How many of you have older siblings that treat them in the same way as the older sister in the family treated her sister?" "How does this make them feel? " "How did the little sister react? Why do you think she acted in this way?" "How do we know that the sisters really love each other?" "Are there ways that you can treat older (or younger) siblings, in a way that lets them know that you really love them?"
  • Ask the children to write two ways they can be considerate and kind to a sibling. This means that they really think about how the younger or older sibling feels. Children with no sibling can write about how they should treat a good friend. Explain to the group that that is how they should treat a brother or sister. They can be a best friend to their brother or sister. Invite volunteers to read their suggestions. Ask them to use one of the suggestions and be ready to share the next day what happened. Make time the next day for this sharing. What happened when they were kind to a brother or sister?
  • Give each child a piece of paper and show him how to fold it into two parts. Display a title for them to copy at the top of the page. “(Sibling’s name)____________ IS LIKE AND UNLIKE ME.” They then label one side ALIKE and the other UNLIKE and list at least three ways they are alike and three ways they are unlike. They write a sentence telling why they love that sibling. A child with no sibling can choose a friend. Those with more than one sibling can choose one of their brothers or sisters. If there is time, the back of the page can be used for them to draw a picture of themselves with their sibling or friend. Suggest that the children sit in groups of three and share their work. The completed pages can be made into a book for the classroom library.

 

Hameray_My_Family_LS-Entry_v3-1.gif5) My Family (LS1) by Adria Klein Ph.D., Barbara Allen, Allison Briceño, Bee Medders, Deb Nemecek, Nicki Smith & Susan Wray

Expectations:

  • Different kinds of families live within a community (Culture, types of homes, languages, customs, traditions)
  • Families have lived in different places in the past

Lesson suggestions:

  • Vocabulary to be developed: 'family,' 'responsibilities,' 'lifestyles,' language spoken,' 'customs,' 'grandparents, ' 'traditions. '
  • As the vocabulary words are used in discussion, listening, reading, and writing, students can record them in their journals, and the words can also be kept in a list on display for teacher to refer to and discuss as the book is used. Make a deliberate attempt to include the use of the vocabulary words.
  • Share the family picture on the front cover of the book. Invite discussion based on the family in the picture. The students can share what they see: members of the family, children and grandparents, a home, etc.
  • After using the book in discussion and reading, the children can draw family portraits similar to the book cover. They then sit in groups of four and each child shares his family portrait and talks about his family.
  • A large group discussion could be based on discussing likenesses and differences in family groups and comparisons made to the cover picture. How many children have grandparents living in the home? What languages are spoken in the homes? How many have younger children and grandparents living in the home. If so, how would that change the way the family members act and are helpful in the home?
  • The book can be read as a read aloud, used in guided reading, and/or placed in the classroom library. The simple sentence pattern of the LS1 (Language Structure 1) book can be used by the children as they create and illustrate small books about their families. These books can be put in the classroom library as well. The last page of the book is a summary statement. Share that statement and why it is a good way to end their books.
  • The picture and text on page 5 can be used to discuss food customs/traditions. Explain that a custom is something that is done at special times and often. Saying the pledge to the flag is a custom in the school. The kind of food that Dad is cooking may be a tradition or something that comes from having past family members share over many years. It may have started in another country. Ask the children to share special foods eaten in their families and decide if those foods are traditional foods. Do the foods have foreign names? Are some of the foods parts of special days or holidays?
Hameray_My_Pets_LS4_v4-1.gif6) My Pets (LS1) by Adria Klein Ph.D., Barbara Allen, Allison Briceño, Bee Medders, Deb Nemecek, Nicki Smith & Susan Wray

Expectations:

  • Families have rules and responsibilities
  • Families work together
  • Family members are independent
  • Understanding that pets are sometimes family members

Lesson suggestions:

  • Vocabulary to be developed: 'rules,' 'responsibilities,' 'kindness,' 'pets,' 'family members,' 'care of pets,' 'feeds.'
  • Display the cover of the book and talk about the boy and his many pets. Ask the children to face a neighbor and share information about their own pet if they have a family pet. Invite the children to share some of the pets they heard about: dogs, cats, fish, birds, hamsters, etc. Make a list on the board, or screen, of each animal mentioned.
  • Conduct a survey on types of pets: have students raise a hand if they have a particular type of pet at home. List the number of responses for each animal. Invite the children to share what they know after seeing the results of the survey. 'What was the most popular pet?' 'Second most popular?' 'Which pets were the most unusual?'
  • Conclude the discussion with what having the pet means to each family member: is it a family friend, someone to play with, a buddy for exercising together, etc.)
  • The next day, introduce the children to Carlos in My Pets. Share the front cover and ask the children to identify a pet Carlos has that none of them has.
  • Suggest that the students listen carefully and find what these animals have in common. (Each animal has to be fed.)
  • After you have shared each page visually and orally, get responses. The following questions could guide the conversation: "What does Carlos have to know about feeding each pet? (When, what food, how much food, where to feed the pet, what does the pet need in addition to food?)
  • Conclude the conversation by sharing the meaning of 'responsibility' and guiding a discussion of responsibilities the family members must have to have a happy and healthy pet. ‘Should this be the parents' responsibility only?’ ‘What can you do be responsible for the care of a pet?’ ‘Page three includes a calendar. What dates might be put on your pet's calendar?’ (Vet visits, shots, grooming, etc.)
  • Each child can draw a picture of a pet and write a description of the pet. If a child has no pet, he can share a pet he would select and describe it. Use the picture on page three to guide children is composing oral sentences about Carlos's dog. Explain that they can look at the picture of their pet and write sentences to describe size, color, kind of pet, what it eats, how the child cares for it, etc.
  • If there are young children in the family, the small ones may need help in understanding how to be kind to pets. ‘What can happen if a family member is not kind to a pet?’ (Pets can become angry and not be kind to the other family members. Friendship between the pet and the human members of the family is threatened. Pets may not trust the family member who is unkind and be unkind to that person. There is less joy in having a pet.)
  • Share the cover of My Pets. ‘How can we tell by Carlos's face that he is kind to his pets.' Revisit the pictures. Do the students see anything that makes them feel that Carlos's pets are not his friends? Ask the students to participate in a shared writing activity that is based ways to be kind to pets.

I hope that you will find ideas you can use with leveled books and enjoy using the language arts activities to deliver the important social studies expectations.

~~~

Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from our Kaleidoscope Collection Series. For more information about the Kaleidoscope Collection Series click HERE to return to our website or click the series highlight page to the left below. 

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Topics: Common Core, Language Standards, Social Studies, First Grade, Grade One

[New Post] Using Language Arts to Meet Social Studies Standards in Grade One: Part 3

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Jan 19, 2016 5:09:10 PM

GHaggardbiopicThis is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children.

This is the third post in a series. You can see the first post here and the second post here.

The purpose of this series of blog posts is threefold: sharing the importance of the social studies standards, explaining how to combine the uses of the Language Arts and Social Studies in the first grade, and sharing ways to use Language Arts Standards and leveled books to deliver social studies expectations centered around homes. Specific books will be keyed to specific social studies standards as examples.

Use of Leveled Books to Deliver Social Studies Expectations for Grade One

I am listing (in alphabetical order) six examples of books appropriate for incorporating language arts standards with social studies expectations in grade one, along with suggestions for language arts activities. I’ll list the first three today, and the second three in the final post. If you’d like to use these ideas as lesson plans for these books, I’ve linked to where you can buy the books, but you can also use these suggestions as guidelines to apply to any similar books you might already have on hand.

clean_your_room_nick_250.jpg1) Clean Your Room, Nick! by Karen Danforth Diaz and Melissa J. Martin

Expectations:

  • Working together as a family
  • Using rules and responsibilities
  • Being independent within a family

Lesson suggestions:

  • Vocabulary development (oral, reading, and writing) words include 'chores,' 'responsibilities,' and the question words 'why,' and 'where.' Model the words orally, Write the words on the board and read them with children as they are written. Include these words in the listening, speaking, writing, and reading activities suggested throughout this post. A list of the words could be a part of the students’ journals. They can refer to the list as they write.
  • Use discussion groups to help students understand the importance of the expectations. Encourage them to use oral language and to be good listeners.
    • "Why did Nick have a problem finding his belongings?"
    • "Has this ever happened to you? Why?"
    • "How do you think Nick's mom is feeling and why?"
    • "Are there other things that Mom could be doing?"
    • "What could have happened to Nick if he had not found his belongings?"
    • "Where did Nick and Mom look for Nick's possessions?"
    • "Should you be responsible for only your room?'
    • "How can you help in other rooms of your home?"
    • "If you look for ways to help without being told to do so, you are being independent. How do you think being independent would help the family?” (Answers might include less conflict, less work for parents, the entire family sharing responsibilities, etc.)
  • Use a brainstorming activity and record on the board a list of chores that the children have in their homes. After the brainstorming, ask the students to illustrate and share a chore or responsibility and provide a title for the illustrations and writing. A book for the classroom library could be created from their work.
  • Brainstorm rules that the children have in their homes. Discuss the difference between chores and rules. A rule might be based on not borrowing or using another family member's belongings without asking, or always being truthful. As a follow-up, different children might act out what happens when a certain rule is broken. The following suggestions may be used as children create a brief drama.
    • Mary used her big sister's jewelry without permission. Show in actions what might happen
    • Billy knocked a lamp off of a table. When his mom asked who did that, he said he did not. Show what might have happen between Billy and his mother.
    • Ann wanted to play a video game and did not do her homework before supper. The family ate supper later than usual and Ann had to go to bed before her homework was done. Make believe you are Ann and her teacher. What might have happened? Ask them to use emotion words and body actions that could be the results of the breaking of the rules. Two students can plan and present their short dramas after using a possible list of rules displayed on the board.
  • The book can be used as a read-aloud, in guided reading groups, or for independent reading. There are several days of activities suggested.

family_day_250.jpg2) Family Day by Christine Jojola

Expectations:

  • Understanding how families are different
  • Understanding what a family is
  • Recognizing that different families have different beliefs, customs, and traditions

Lesson suggestions:

  • Vocabulary development words include 'family,' 'beliefs,' 'languages,' ' customs,' and 'traditions.'
  • Ask the children to list in their journals the members of their families. They could then sit in groups of three or four and each member of the group can share the number of people in the family, number of children, and number of other family members (parents, grandparents, etc.) A bar graph could then be shared on the board: one child, two children, three children, four or more children, number of adults). The graph will show the differences in the composition of the families.
  • Share the picture from the front of the book. Discuss what the picture tells them about the family in the book. The last picture in the book depicts two older family members. "Where is the family in the cover picture and the last page of the book? (Park; patio at home.) The students can draw a sketch of their homes and sit in small groups and share facts with another student or two.
    • How many rooms?
    • Do they have to share a room with someone else?
    • What is in the yards?
    • Is the home in the country or in a city?

After small group sharing, a representative from each group can discuss with the large group the results of sharing the sketches. What are some differences and likenesses?

  • Why did Zavier wear different clothes or footwear on different days? Explain that the way a person dresses for playing ball is an example of a custom. The special clothes indicate what sport is to be enjoyed. The colors of the uniforms help identify the player’s team. Ask the children, "Is there a time that your family dresses in a different way? Why?" People from different countries may dress differently from others. Their way of dressing tells us about their culture.
  • People from different cultures may celebrate holiday seasons in different ways. As children brainstorm, make a list of these cultural traditions for celebrating holidays in December.
  • The family on the last page is wearing their best clothes. We call this 'dressing up.'
    • “What do you think the family is about to do?”
    • “Some families dress up to go to church or to parties. When does your family dress up?”
    • “What is a special "family day' for your family. If you do this often, it becomes a custom or tradition.”
  • The children could be invited to bring pictures of their families participating in a special family day that might be connected to a special holiday, etc. These could be displayed on a bulletin board labeled “SPECIAL CUSTOMS AND TRADITIONS.”
  • A culminating activity could be writing a story that includes all of the child's family and customs or traditions that are a part of the family. Other students and the teacher can serve as editors and advisors. Display and share the stories. Invite the child who wrote the story to share and explain the story he wrote.

Helping-Mom-250.jpg3) Helping Mom by Jane Hunter

Expectations:

  • Families have responsibilities
  • Families work together
  • Our families help us

Lesson suggestions:

  • Vocabulary to be developed includes 'cleaning,’ 'washing,' 'independent,' 'setting,' 'rules,' 'volunteer,' 'responsibility.' These words can be entered in journals as they are used in discussion and/or reading. Children need to hear the words, use them as they speak, read, and write. Multiple uses of the words and multiple occasions for seeing the words can help the words become a part of the children's multi-vocabularies. Other words may need to be added to the list.
  • The book can be used as a read-aloud. Set the purposes for listening to the story: What does the boy do to help his mom? How does his mom help him?
    • As the first question is discussed, the picture of the boy helping can be shared as children sit around you, or shown on a screen or board. Later the book could be used in guided reading or placed in the class library.
    • As the second question is discussed, share the homework pictures on the last two pages of the book and add sub-questions:
      • "When do you need help with homework?”
      • “If you can do your homework without help, what should you do?”
      • “Is homework your responsibility or someone else's?"
      • "What is a responsibility?"
  • Ask each child to make a list of ways they help other members of their families. Give each child a medium-sized piece of paper and ask him to draw a picture of a way he helps. Use a bulletin board or poster board to make a collage of the pictures. Label it, “WAYS WE HELP AT HOME.”
  • Ask each child to interview a parent and share what they hear the parent say can happen when the child helps. The next day, you can write a language experience activity with each child's name and their responses. As the teacher uses a pointer, each child can read what was recorded by his name.
  • As a culminating activity, discuss the words 'volunteer' and 'independent.' Provide an opportunity for students to discuss the difference between an assigned task and a volunteered task. Share as an example the boy helping his mom with the baby. He probably also volunteered to help mom with baking. This means he did not have to be asked to do these things. We see the picture of him working independently with his homework. These pictures from the book could be shared again. Are there children who can share ways they help without being asked? If so, tell them that they are being independent and are volunteers!

The next and final post in this series will focus on the use of the remaining three books to tie these standards in with social studies standards and expectations. Check back next week to read more, or subscribe to the blog in the sidebar to get new posts delivered to your inbox!                     

~~~

Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from our Kaleidoscope Collection Series. For more information about the Kaleidoscope Collection Series click HERE to return to our website or click the series highlight page to the left below. 

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Topics: Common Core, Kaleidoscope Collection, Language Standards, Geraldine Haggard, Social Studies, First Grade, Grade One

[New Post] Using Language Arts to Meet Social Studies Standards in Grade One: Part 2

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Jan 13, 2016 1:38:58 PM

GHaggardbiopicThis is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children.

This is the second post in a series. You can see the first post here.

The purpose of this series of blog posts is threefold: sharing the importance of the social studies standards, explaining how to combine the uses of the Language Arts and Social Studies in the first grade, and sharing ways to use Language Arts Standards and leveled books to deliver social studies expectations centered around homes. Specific books will be keyed to specific social studies standards as examples.

Identification of "Language Arts Standards" That Can Help Teachers Strengthen Both Social Studies And Language Arts

The following standards for the language arts can be integrated with the social studies expectations. It is essential that the latter not be neglected.  The suggested tools will first be listed under the categories for the language arts.

STANDARD ONE: WRITING

  • Participate in prewriting activities such as brainstorming, discussion, webbing, illustrating, or story starters

STANDARD TWO: MODES AND FORMS OF WRITING

  • Compose simple narrative
  • Write brief description, using some details, of a real object, person, or place or event

STANDARDS ONE AND TWO:  ORAL LANGUAGE/LISTENING AND SPEAKING

  • Listen attentively and ask questions for clarification and understanding
  • Stay on topic when speaking
  • Use descriptive words when speaking by answering who, when, where, why, and how questions
  • Relate an important life event or personal experience in a simple sequence
  • Use descriptive words when speaking about people, places, events and people
  • Provide descriptions with attention to sensory detail

STANDARD THREE: GROUP INTERACTION

  • Show respect and consideration for others in verbal and physical communication
  • Make contributions to group discussions

STANDARD FOUR: VOCABULARY

  • Increase personal vocabulary by listening to and reading a variety of texts and literature
  • Discuss unfamiliar oral and/or written vocabulary after listening to or reading texts

 STANDARD SIX: COMPREHENSION/CRITICAL LITERATURE

  • Read and comprehend both fiction and non-fiction
  • Use pre-reading strategies (prior knowledge, predicting, and establishing a purpose for reading)
  • Respond to questions designed to aid general meaning
  • Respond to who, what, when, where, why, and how questions
  • Draw and discuss visual images based on text information
  • Identify simple cause and effect

The next post in this series will focus on the use of particular books to tie these standards in with social studies standards and expectations. Check back next week to read more, or subscribe to the blog in the sidebar to get new posts delivered to your inbox!                     

~~~

Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from our Kaleidoscope Collection Series. For more information about the Kaleidoscope Collection Series click HERE to return to our website or click the series highlight page to the left below. 

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Topics: Common Core, Language Standards, Geraldine Haggard, Social Studies, First Grade, Grade One

[New Post] Using Language Arts to Meet Social Studies Standards in Grade One: Part 1

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Jan 5, 2016 3:30:00 PM

GHaggardbiopicThis is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children.

The purpose of this series of blog posts is threefold: sharing the importance of the social studies standards, explaining how to combine the uses of the Language Arts and Social Studies in the first grade, and sharing ways to use Language Arts Standards and leveled books to deliver social studies expectations centered around homes. Specific books will be keyed to specific social studies standards as examples.

The Importance of Social Studies

crossing_guard_82988776_Glenda_M_Powers-300.jpgFirst grade children are living in a swiftly changing society. There is a great need for them to recognize how the past and present are alike and different. They will be required to problem solve within societal constraints. Understanding the importance of authority roles and rules is essential, as is anticipation of long-term consequences of poor decisions.

First grade children are interested in games and problem solving. They love hearing and talking about heroes and need to develop an appreciation for the past generations of their families. They enter the classroom with differences among them in terms of socioeconomics, cultures, value systems, experiences, and learning styles. How does a teacher help these children from very different home backgrounds prepare for the future?

Schools are very aware of the continued need for developing vocabulary, reading and writing skills. Can these skills become strategies to facilitate the future success of young students? I think many of the "Language Arts Standards" can be used with leveled books to place a new importance on social studies.

A conversation with a member of the National Association for Social Studies gave me insight into the teaching of social studies. The states are looking at "expectations" for the studies as the social studies curriculum is defined. The grade one expectations are mainly based on the home and community. This series of blog posts will concentrate on the home and the tools for delivery of these home based standards.

Click here for the second post in the series, which identifies which Language Arts Standards are also helpful in the teaching of social studies.

~~~

Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from our Kaleidoscope Collection Series. For more information about the Kaleidoscope Collection Series click HERE to return to our website or click the series highlight page to the left below. 

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Topics: Common Core, Language Standards, Geraldine Haggard, Social Studies, First Grade, Grade One

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