Hameray Classroom Literacy Blog!

Guided Reading to Support Textbook Reading, Part 3

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Mar 14, 2017 3:34:00 PM

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This is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. It is the second post in a series about using guided reading activities to support content-area textbook reading. To read the first post, click here.

SOCIAL STUDIES READING SUPPORT

The same procedures used for teaching Fantastic Frogs can be used to teach higher-level books like Benjamin Franklin from the Hameray Biography Series. The biography is a longer book, and thus contains more informational text tools:

  • The TABLE OF CONTENTS includes chapter titles. Discuss the meaning of a chapter.
  • Invite students to go to page 38 for the LEARN MORE section. A list of books and websites encourage students to do more reading about Benjamin Franklin.
  • Use CHAPTER 1 for guided reading. Discuss the picture on page 4: Why is Franklin hungry? Who is the young woman?
  • Ask the students to read with you in a guided reading setting. After reading, discuss the answers to the two questions.
  • Ask the students if there are any unfamiliar words in the chapter. Invite the students to find the bolded words in the glossary and use the words to create their own sentences.
  • What happens in a print shop? What is a document? Can you think of an example of a document?

hameray-biography-series-benjamin-franklin.jpg

THINGS TO REMEMBER ABOUT TEXTBOOK READING

  • Remind the students about the various informational text features that can help them read the text.
  • Emphasize the importance of pictures and their own prior knowledge to supplement their reading.
  • Encourage rereading and making a note of questions. Using graphic organizers allow the students to write what they already knew, what they need to learn, and questions still left unanswered by the text.
  • Ask children to do further reading on the content area topic.

Using parts of content area books for guided and shared reading will help students both in content area subjects and language arts. Don’t forget to frequently use the new vocabulary in your classroom!

~~~

Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from our Kaleidoscope Collection. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children. 

~~~

Click the image below to download a FREE Teacher's Guide for Benjamin Franklin. 

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Topics: Informational Text, Biography Series, Geraldine Haggard, Guided Reading, Social Studies

Guided Reading to Support Textbook Reading, Part 2

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Mar 7, 2017 3:34:00 PM

GHaggardbiopic

This is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. It is the second post in a series about using guided reading activities to support content-area textbook reading. To read the first post, click here.

In today's post, I'll give examples of how to provide textbook reading support for science lessons in the lower elementary grades.

PREPARATION OF TEXTBOOK SUPPORT 

There are several tasks to complete before you can formally support readers in using content area reading texts.

First, you should explore available materials and select diverse reading materials that support the standards for the unit of study in the content area:

  • Formal textbook content that is up-to-date and appropriate
  • Books in classroom libraries and school libraries
  • Books for guided and shared reading during language arts lessons
  • Computer sites that are available and approved by your district. 

If you find a formal textbook to use, select the appropriate sections of the textbook and consider how much assistance they will need to read the text. It is important that all students are given support for two aspects of textbook reading: content-specific vocabulary and informational text features.

NEW VOCABULARY

New vocabulary can present challenges: pronunciation, words with multiple meanings, and a lack of prior knowledge about the word and how it is used in new content. The following activities can help prepare the students for their introduction to new vocabulary:

  • A short video that introduces the unit of study and contains some of the new vocabulary
  • Reading books that introduce the topic
  • Teaching the students how to use a glossary
  • Helping students hear word segments by clapping the syllables in a new word. (As a fourth grade teacher, I used a bulletin board to divide the words into syllables and play riddle games. We also played bingo that enabled them to practice writing the word and remember its definition.)

Remember that students must understand the meaning of a word as they hear and see it. Writing the word can help the word become a part of their mastered vocabulary.

INFORMATIONAL TEXT FEATURES

Introduce students to the informational text features that provide tools to help understand new topics and vocabulary. Project a copy of Fantastic Frogs from Hameray’s Real World collection or use guided reading copies.

real-world-fantastic-frogs.jpg

Front cover:

  • Discuss the information that the cover provides, including the title, author, and publisher.
  • Why do you think there is a picture on the cover?
  • What does “fantastic” mean?

Title page:

  • How is the title page similar to the front cover? How is it different?
  • Do you think the picture is fantastic? Why?

Pages 4 – 5:

  • What is the title or subject of these two pages?
  • Study the pictures. How do they help the student’s understanding of the text?
  • Ask the student to do shared reading while reading the pages. Slowly pronounce the two bolded words. Ask the students to use the glossary to identify the words.
  • Invite the students to discuss why frogs might need to adapt. Can you think of other amphibians that live on land and water?

Make sure to note that every word in the index was also included in the glossary, which explains content-specific vocabulary.

Next Tuesday, I’ll discuss how to apply this reading support for higher-level social studies curriculum. Make sure to subscribe to the blog in the right-hand toolbar to receive my new post in your inbox! 

~~~

Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from our Kaleidoscope Collection. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children. 

~~~

Click the image below to learn about Story World Real World, which features the book mentioned in this post. 

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Topics: Real World, Informational Text, Geraldine Haggard, Science, Guided Reading

Guided Reading to Support Textbook Reading, Part 1

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Feb 14, 2017 2:42:00 PM

GHaggardbiopic

This is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. It is the first post in a series about using guided reading activities to support content-area textbook reading.

The blog will demonstrate why students need explicit guidance when reading textbooks. Textbooks are often the backbone of content area classrooms, but can pose many challenges for a budding reader.

CHALLENGES OF USING FORMAL TEXTBOOKS

First, let’s examine the characteristics of formal educational textbooks and the challenges they present:

  • Textbooks are often written at a reading level above the students’ grade level.
  • The authors of textbooks have no conception of how much—or how little—prior knowledge their readers bring to the text.
  • An enormous amount of new vocabulary must be acquired if the child is to read with full comprehension. Students need very strong strategies, such as letter knowledge, for decoding these unfamiliar words. 
  • Many vocabulary words in content area-specific textbooks are not part of the everyday language. Students must read words that they have never heard before, making comprehension difficult.
  • Long paragraphs and passages, packed with new information, can overwhelm readers. The teacher needs to sort through and focus only on the information needed to master a specific concept.
  • Sometimes, students are asked to read silently without knowing the goals of textbook reading. Many students do not know how to independently set goals when reading formal texts and how to monitor their comprehension. The student may be led to think that they need to memorize the entire text.
  • Some textbooks are outdated and contain old information. The teacher must study the textbook carefully and only use sections that remain relevant and accurate. Additional sources of information should be used to support the textbook, adding opportunities for critical thinking and synthesis skills.
  • Good textbooks include specific features to help the reader. The reader needs to learn how to use the table of contents, index, glossary, diagrams, charts, and maps.

child science book_13183583_Nyul.jpg

Research shows us that student average comprehension percentiles become lower and lower as the students go into higher grade levels. We know that reading content area material is more difficult than reading narratives because it demands a more specific and sophisticated level of comprehension.

Intermediate, middle school, or high school teachers report that many students do not enjoy content area reading and have difficulty with textbooks. The joy that we often see in our younger readers as they learn about the world is not always present in the older reader.

Clearly, teachers of all grade levels need to provide verbal and guiding reading support for content area reading. Teacher can interact with students in small groups, large groups, and individual settings.

My next blog post will introduce guided reading activities and ideas for teachers to incorporate content area activities into the classroom.

~~~

Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from our Kaleidoscope Collection. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children. 

~~~

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Topics: Geraldine Haggard, Science, Guided Reading, Math, Social Studies

The Role of Big Books and Shared Reading, Part 3

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Dec 20, 2016 3:03:00 PM

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This is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. To read the first article in this blog series about shared reading, click here. To read the second article, click here.

In the third and last post of this blog series, I will offer ways to use Joy Cowley big books for shared reading activities in your classroom.

BOOK THREE: WISHY-WASHY MOUSE

REASONS FOR SHARED READING:

  • Many students are familiar with Mrs. Wishy- Washy and her animals.
  • The book uses words ending in '-y' that are pronounced with the 'e' sound.
  • The book provides opportunities for inferential questions: why didn’t the animals help Mrs. Wishy-Washy get the mouse out of the barn?
  • The last page of the book uses quotation marks.
  • The word "help” appears as an uppercase "H" on page 3 and a lowercase "h" on pages 4 and 5.
  • The sight words 'is,’ 'in,’ 'the,’ 'did,’ 'not,’ 'said,' 'come,’ and 'out' are featured in the story.
  • The illustrations help the children understand character traits and feelings, helping to promote fluency.
  • The children can hear how the reader's voice changes with periods, quotation marks, and exclamation marks.

SUGGESTIONS FOR FIRST READING:

  • Introduce the book title and provide opportunities for children share what they know about Mrs. Wishy-Washy. Use the title page to introduce the mouse. What do you know about mice? Where do you think the mouse is? Why do you think that?
  • Read the story to the children, employing emotion as you read. As you come to multisyllabic words, tap the pointer to indicate the number of syllables.
  • After reading the story, ask the children to discuss how Mrs. Wishy-Washy and the animals felt about the mouse. Why did Mrs. Wishy-Washy ask for help? Why did the duck tell the mouse to come out 'now'? Why did Mrs. Wishy-Washy run back to the house?
  • Discuss the dialogue on page 8. How do we know that duck said this? Ask the children how the duck was feeling. Stress the word 'now.' Why is that word important?

SUGGESTIONS FOR SECOND READING:

  • Encourage the children to read along with you. What do the children think the word 'cried' means? Is it different from being 'sad'? When you get to page 8, invite a child to be the duck and the rest of the class to read the last line on that page.
  • Study the picture on the title page and the picture on page 2. What happened to the mouse between the two pages? When do you think Mrs. Wishy-Washy first saw the mouse?
  • Ask the children to study the faces of the animals on the last page. How do the animals feel about what happened? What might they be thinking?
  • Ask different children to use the pointer. If the child has trouble with 'one to one,' guide the student's hand, slowly reading and tapping out syllables in words with more than one syllable.

JCEB_WWMouse.jpg

FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES:

  • Create a blank bingo-shaped grid with a free center square. Prepare large flashcards with eight sight words or write each word on the board. Ask the children to write each word in one of the squares on their grid. Explain that everyone has created his or her own game boards. Call each word one time, encouraging students to listen for sounds in the word. After the students have put an 'x' on the word they think is correct, ask them to spell and say the word with you. If they were correct they can draw a smiley face inside the box. Two of the words begin alike but have different endings. The other six all begin with different sounds. Collect the students’ game boards to help you evaluate each child’s sight-reading strengths. Were they able to accurately write the words? Are there letters that they are still reversing?
  • Ask the children to draw a picture about a time when they were scared. Add a speech bubble above their heads and write a line of dialogue. Add a caption to explain what is happening in the picture.

FURTHER REREADING:

  • Use the book in oral or silent guided reading. The book can then go home for sharing with the family.
  • Add more Mrs. Wishy-Washy books into your class library.
  • Place the big book in a center or the class library. Students can take turns playing the role of the teacher.

 

BOOK FOUR: DAN AND THE PARROT

REASONS FOR SHARED READING:

  • The story includes dialogue that will help practice fluency and reinforce quotation marks and exclamation marks.
  • Rhyming patterns '-an,' '-ash,’ '-ay,’ and '-age' are included. Page 4 and 12 contain words that rhyme but have different spellings.
  • The text includes the contractions 'don't,' 'can't,' 'I'm,' 'you're,’ and 'I'll.’
  • Examples of onomatopoeia are on pages 8, 11, and 13.
  • The story allows for inference questions: What did the parrot mean when it called itself 'tricky'? Why did the parrot tell Dan that he was ' as slow as a flying carrot' on page 9?
  • Some words contain all capital letters. How are these words different?
  • Two synonyms for 'yelled' are used in the story: cried and shrieked. Why did the author use different words?
  • Words ending in '-ing,' '-ed,’ and ‘-y' are used more than once in the story. Discuss the purpose of these particles.
  • The pictures provide good clues for unknown words and understanding character traits.

SUGGESTIONS FOR FIRST READING:

  • If students are already familiar with Dan the Flying Man, ask them to share what they know about Dan.
  • Introduce the three characters on front cover. Ask the children to predict some things that might happen in the story. Turn to the title page. What does the picture tell us?
  • Use a pointer as your read with expression and emotion. Exaggerate the quotation marks and exclamation points.
  • Discuss the main conflict and Dan’s resolution. Why did Gran call Dan "a clever man”?
  • Discuss ways that the Dan and the parrot are alike and different. Use pictures from the books for hints (setting, size, method of flying, etc.) Create a T-chart to record the children's comparisons.

SUGGESTIONS FOR SECOND READING:

  • Encourage students to read along with you and adopt the different character’s voices. Point out the exclamation mark on page 1 and reaffirm its purpose. Practice as a class.
  • Read the story, using a pointer and talking like the characters.

JC_DanAndTheParrot.jpg

FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES:

  • Assign each child to a character in the book. Students without an assigned character can 'SWOOP’ and ‘FLIP-FLAP.' The picture on each page will give clues about which character is speaking. You can point to the character to help the children understand when they should speak.
  • Provide a list of the contractions in the book and ask the students to write the two words that formed the contraction. Then write a sentence using the contraction.
  • The simile "slow as a carrot' was used in the story. Discuss the definition of a simile. The following simile patterns can be included on an activity sheet with blank spaces for the children to complete the simile:
    • The parrot's wings could flap as fast as ________ __________.
    • Dan could fly as high as ________ ____________________!
    • Dan swooped into the air like ________ _______________.
    • As the story ended, the parrot was as mad as ________ ________.
  • Explore the following word meanings, using pictures as clues:
    • "That's not fair!"
    • "I don't care!"
    • shriek with rage"
  • Ask students to study the picture on the final page. What is probably going to happen again?

FURTHER REREADING:

  • Place the book in a center where children can read the story and assume the role of teacher. The book can also be used with a shared reading group or shared with families.
  • Add the other Dan the Flying Man books to the classroom library.

I hope that this blog series has helped you understand the power of shared reading and that you will enjoy it as much as I have over the years. Not only is it a delightful way to spend time with all students, but it also provides ample opportunity for follow-up activities based on your students’ needs.

 

~~~

Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from Hameray's Kaleidoscope Collection. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children. 

~~~

Visit our website to learn more about Wishy-Washy Mouse, Dan and the Parrot, and other books by Joy Cowley. Click the image below to download a brochure featuring Hameray's Big Books Collection!

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Topics: Joy Cowley Early Birds, Big Books, Shared Reading, Geraldine Haggard, Guided Reading

The Role of Big Books and Shared Reading, Part 2

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Dec 13, 2016 3:03:00 PM

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This is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. To read the first article in this blog series about shared reading, click here

In the second post of this blog series, I will introduce two Hameray books that are excellent choices for shared reading.

BOOK ONE: HALLOWEEN NIGHT

REASONS FOR SHARED READING:

*Topic is of special interest to children of all ages.

*The story utilizes a repetitive sentence pattern. ("I saw a ________looking at me.")

*Page six repeats the names of the things the boy saw. Beginning letter sounds can be used as clues.

*The introductory phrase "On Halloween night" can be used to discuss breathing at comma, while the exclamation mark on page 7 allows for reading with excitement. There are quotation marks around "BOO."

*Multisyllabic words such as 'Halloween,’ 'vampire,’ 'mummy,’ 'shouted,’ 'away,’ and 'jack-o-lantern' are included.

*Sight words such as ‘a,’ ‘at,’ ‘rat,’ and ‘on’ offer multiple opportunities for the students to see and read the words.

SUGGESTIONS FOR FIRST READING:

  • Introduce the title and ask children when and where they think the story is taking place. Invite them to talk about the picture on the front cover. Quickly visit each page and asks children if they can identify objects in the pictures. Remind them that they may know the beginning sounds of these words.
  • Read the story to the children without inviting them to read with you. Read with great excitement and feeling. Tap the pointer for multi-syllable words.
  • Ask the children to predict why the characters all ran away on page 8. How does the picture help?
  • Ask the children to discuss things that might happen next in the story.kaleidoscope-collection-halloween-night-2-1.jpg

SUGGESTIONS FOR SECOND READING:

  • As you revisit the story, invite the children to read along with you. Continue to use the pointer and read slowly enough that the children can read along with you with fluency and emotion. Children might frame sight words.
  • Reread sentences with multisyllabic words and clap out each syllable.
  • Display the following story map on the screen or board. Have the children complete the sentences:
    • On Halloween night, I saw a ______________.
    • On Halloween night I saw a _______________.
    • On Halloween night, I saw a _______________.
    • On Halloween night, I saw a _______________, a ________________, and a ____________.
    • They all ___________. (Accept various responses.)
  • Have each student write his or her own story, using the shared writing exercise as a guide. After illustrating, children can sit in groups of two or three and share their stories. Remind them that their pictures provide clues for their stories.

FURTHER REREREADING:

  • Use guided reading copies and/or big books in the class library. Allow students to read in small groups with one child assuming the role of the teacher. The shared writing could be displayed on the board as a center and the children read as a group with one child using a pointer.

 

BOOK TWO: MUD SOUP

REASONS FOR SHARED READING:

  • Pages 2−6 of the book are based on a simple sentence pattern.
  • Page 7 contains a word that is repeated three times. The picture serves as a great clue for reading 'stir.’
  • Sight words "went' and 'the' are repeated on several pages.
  • Periods and exclamation marks allow for reading with fluency and emotion.
  • The phrase "In went the _______" is repeated five times.
  • Young children enjoy playing with water and dirt!

SUGGESTIONS FOR FIRST READING:

  • Share the front cover of the big book. Ask the children to name the items they see and suggest what they think the boy may do. Point to the words in the title and read the words.
  • Turn to the inside title page and reread the name of the book. Explain that the author took pictures to illustrate her book. Study the picture on the title page. What is the boy doing?
  • Go to page 2 and read the story to the children using a pointer. Read with expression and breathe in the proper places.
  • Revisit pages 2-6 and ask a child to frame the words 'dirt,' 'water,' ‘sticks,’ 'leaves,’ and 'stones.’ After each word is framed, ask the child to frame the beginning sound and share the name of the first letter in the words. Explain that these letters can help them read the words, but the pictures can also give them clues to recognizing the word. 
  • What letter is at the end of the word ‘in’? Do you hear that 'n' as they say the word? You can similarly model the upper and lower case "i." Remind the children that the first word in a sentence always begins with a capital letter.

kaleidoscope-collection-mud-soup-2.jpg

SUGGESTIONS FOR SECOND READING:

  • Invite the children to read with you. Use a pointer as you read and read slowly enough that they can read with you. Pause at periods and exclamation marks and discuss their purposes. How is the exclamation mark read differently from the period?
  • Students should recognize some capital letters. Page 6 includes both upper and lower case 'w.'
  • Discuss the plural forms on pages 4, 5, and 6. How does adding 's' to these words change the meanings of the words?
  • As a shared writing activity, write a how-to for making FRUIT SALAD or VEGETABLE SOUP. First decide what contained to use instead of the bucket. Invite a child to write a sight word or beginning sounds for names of ingredients. The completed writing should remain posted so children can see their work. The children can then draw the ingredients they would want in their soup or salad and label each picture.

FURTHER REREADING:

  • A guided reading copy could be taken home for reading and sharing with family.
  • The book could be reread in a guided group session for those who are ready to read the book.
  • Add the big book to a center or the class library. Students can take turns using the pointer and framing words.

In my next post, I will introduce two more Hameray books with suggestions for shared reading activities.

~~~

Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from Hameray's Kaleidoscope Collection. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children. 

~~~

Visit our website to learn more about Halloween Night and Mud Soup. Click the image below to download a brochure featuring Hameray's Big Books Collection!

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Topics: Big Books, Shared Reading, Geraldine Haggard, Guided Reading

The Role of Big Books and Shared Reading

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Nov 8, 2016 3:49:00 PM

GHaggardbiopic

This is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. 

As the first article in a new series, this blog post is designed to share the history and purpose of big books. In subsequent posts, I will share suggestions for the use of three Hameray big books.

HISTORY FOR THE ENDORSEMENT OF USING BIG BOOKS

Don Holdaway refers to big books as “shared-book experiences” in his book The Foundations of Literacy (1979). He discussed students who are not fortunate enough to experience bedtime stories. These children neither possess the early oral language skills of their peers before entering school nor the warm personal experience with an adult who shared the excitement of reading. Holdaway found that when all the students could see the text in a shared reading book, they understand the role of print in reading.

Once, I attended a trip led by Don Holdaway and visited New Zealand schools. I watched Don and teachers in New Zealand use of published big books and class-made big books. I saw children excitedly reading big books together after the books had been used with the entire class. The classes in New Zealand had children of different ages grouped together, so guided reading was a part of the many collective reading activities in the classroom. 

child reading books_14715389_Otnaydur.jpgATTRIBUTES OF SHARED READING

A teacher must choose a big book that the students will want to read and reread. The book should contain repeated phrases and sentences, rhyming words, and pictures that support the text. Such a book will strengthen the oral language skills of the students in a non-threatening way. 

In Different Paths to Common Outcomes (1998), Marie Clay recommends that the teacher move from whole to parts of words, emphasizing the semantic and syntactic cues.

The first reading is done by the teacher after an introduction to the book. The children are not invited to read along but may use any prior knowledge to talk about the book’s content. Thirty minutes is sufficient for the teacher to model, discuss, and guide students.

     Later readings allow students to read along with the teacher in big groups, small groups, and independently.

 

 

 

 

REASONS FOR SHARED READING EXPERIENCES

  • Shared reading provides an opportunity for the entire class to participate, allowing everyone to feel successful and be a part of a happy experience with a book.
  • Children who fear that reading is difficult can have a sense of individual achievement.
  • The teacher can introduce new strategies, provide opportunities for practice, and help students truly understand the importance of the strategies.
  • Discussion allows students to use prior knowledge that will provide a foundation for strong reading comprehension skills.
  • The details of letters and words can be discussed and used later in writing.
  • Students become familiar with essential sight words.
  • The teacher can model the cross-checking strategy that is essential to good reading, teaching students the semantics and syntax behind questions: "Did that make sense? Did that sound right?" Clay believes that meaning and syntax came before print details.
  • Fluent reading by the teacher and emphasis of punctuation can help students use punctuation marks as they read text with emotion and meaning.
  • Research shares that multiple readings of a text are important. Shared reading big books can be a part of the class library, while smaller copies of the book can become home reading.

In New Zealand, I saw small groups of children revisiting and reading texts from shared reading. One student even assumed the role of the teacher!

In my next post, I will present example lessons from the Hameray Big Book Collection. Subscribe in the right-hand sidebar to receive my next post in your mailbox.

~~~

Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from Hameray's Kaleidoscope Collection. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children. 

~~~

Click the image below to download a brochure featuring Hameray's Big Books Collection!

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Topics: Big Books, Shared Reading, Geraldine Haggard, Guided Reading

Book Introductions With Guided Reading Groups, Part 3

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Sep 27, 2016 3:45:00 PM

GHaggardbiopic

This is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. It is the third and last post in a series about utilizing book introductions to help guided reading groups develop their reading strategies. To read the first post (introduction), click here. To read the second post, click here.

This blog series focuses on the importance of book introductions in guided reading groups. Today, I will conclude this series by examining a Level I book, The Ungrateful Tiger, and provide an opportunity for teacher reflection after giving a book introduction to guided reading groups.

BOOK THREE: THE UNGRATEFUL TIGER

Series: Fables and the Real World. Guided Reading Level: I (i). Genre: Fable.

PREPARATION:

  • You might want to remind the children of the definition of a fable.
  • The word "ungrateful" has both a prefix and a suffix. The multi-meaning word 'fair' is also a key word throughout the story and the group needs to understand what it means in the story.

 

INTRODUCTION:

  • Distribute the books. Ask the children to notice the word in green at the top of the front cover. Remind them of a fable that you know they are familiar with and how it teaches a lesson. Explain that this book does the same thing.
  • Read the title to the children. Ask them to frame the first and last syllables and find that 'un' means 'not' and 'ful' means 'full.’ They can predict that 'ungrateful' means 'not being full of thanks.’
  • Ask the children to study the pictures and meet the main characters in the story (the boy, the tiger, and the owl).
  • Ask the children to turn to page 8 and study the picture and frame the word 'pounced.’ How does the picture help them determine the meaning of 'pounced’? Remind them that the pictures can provide clues for meaning as they read the story.
  • Remind the students that they should think about this fable’s lesson while they read. Who learned the lesson? Remember to discuss this question after the first reading.

FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES:

  • After the first reading, a second reading could be done as a reader's theater. The teacher can be the narrator and students read the conversations of the men, the tiger, and the owl. This reading can demonstrate knowledge of traits and emotions of the characters.
  • The book also is a good tool for discussing cause and effect. Why did the men dig the pit? Why did the tiger cry for help? Why did the boy help the tiger out of the pit? What happened because the boy got the tiger out of the pit? Why did the owl know what was happening between the boy and the tiger?
  • You can read another fable to the children or provide fables that they can read with 95 percent accuracy or better. Children can also share a fable they read in the past and why it was a fable.

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SOME CLOSING THOUGHTS FOR TEACHER AFTER THE FIRST READING

  • Do you think your introduction helped the children more fluently use a strategy they are developing or use a new strategy for the first time?
  • Was the reading rate appropriate?
  • Did the children exhibit some feelings or facial and vocal emotions that demonstrated their understanding of character emotions? Did they use the punctuation marks as clues to understanding the character traits and feelings?
  • Did the students demonstrate a need for a reading strategy that you didn’t introduce? Think about that strategy as you plan the introduction of the next book.
  • Remember that multiple readings of a book are important. The students can reread the book at home. The book can be placed in the class library for even more readings. Help your parents understand the importance of the re-readings.

As you use carefully planned book introductions, you will find your readers improving their use of strategies and becoming more independent readers. Selecting just the right book and identifying what support the group needs to read a new book will help students improve their reading strategies, fluency, and reading rate.

~~~

Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from our Kaleidoscope Collection. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children. 

~~~

Click the left image below to download an information sheet with key features about Fables and the Real World, which contains the book featured in this article.

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Topics: Leveled Readers, Geraldine Haggard, Guided Reading, Fables and the Real World, Book Introductions

Book Introductions With Guided Reading Groups, Part 2

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Sep 20, 2016 2:50:00 PM

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This is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. It is the second in a series about utilizing book introductions to help guided reading groups develop their reading strategies. To read the first post, click here.

The first blog in this series included reasons to use book introductions in a guided reading group setting. I also included hints for selection of a “just right book” and tips on teacher preparation for the introduction. Today's blog shares examples of effective book introductions for two differently-leveled Hameray titles: Buddy Boy and His Skateboard and Dragon's Friend.

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BOOK ONE: BUDDY BOY AND HIS SKATEBOARD

Series: Kaleidoscope Collection. Guided reading level: E. Genre: Narrative.

PREPARATION:

Imagine that your guided reading groups includes children who were not reading with fluency. As you read Buddy Boy and His Skateboard, you feel that the quotations in the book could be used to help children read more fluently and recognize the use of the quotation marks.

There are three compound words in the story: 'someone,' 'skateboard,' and 'grandma.' You predict that the children can use the pictures and meaning cues to determine the two latter words, but you decide to introduce the word 'someone' in your introduction.

BOOK INTRODUCTION:

  • Distribute the books. Ask the children to study the cover and meet Buddy Boy. Where is he? How do you think he feels about the skateboard? As we read the story we will discover how he enjoys the skateboard, and how something sad almost happens to him.
  • Ask the children to look through the pictures and decide who the other characters in the book are.
  • Use page 3 to introduce the quotation marks. Model what Mom said with expression and ask the children to read the two lines of conversation with you. Remind them to read all the quotations in the story in that way. You might emphasize the word 'Please.’
  • Now we are ready to read and find out what happens to Buddy Boy and his skateboard.
  • Watch and listen as the children do the first reading of the book. Did they read with fluency?

FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES

Follow up the reading with these discussion questions:

  • Why does Buddy Boy have the skateboard in bed with him?
  • What lesson do you think Buddy Boy learned?
  • Why do you think his dad threatened to take his skateboard?

JCEBJ_DragonsFriend.jpg

BOOK TWO: DRAGON'S FRIEND

Series: Joy Cowley Early Birds. Guided Reading Level: G. Genre: Narrative.

PREPARATION:

Three notable punctuation marks appear in the book. The apostrophes make the word a possessive. The quotation and exclamation marks can help students read with greater fluency and expression and understand the characters’ emotions.

Multiple-meaning words also appear in the book. Page 2 introduces the word 'poor.’ Page 10 introduces the word 'scales.' The picture on the two pages can help the children understand the meanings of these words. The word 'cared' on page 14 is important to help the students understand why the dragon decides he has friends.

INTRODUCTION:

  • Distribute the books. Ask the children to study the front cover. Read the title with the children. Why do you think the dragon is crying? How many dragons are in the picture? Why does the word “Dragon's” contain an apostrophe? Explain its meaning.
  • Use the title page to meet the other characters in the story. Where might they be? Why are they looking down? What do you think they may find?
  • Ask the children to read the first line on page 2. Encourage them to use the picture and discuss the idea of the dragon being 'poor.' Go to page 14 and use the double picture to discover the meaning of the word 'cared.' The readers need to understand why the children helped the dragon.
  • Ask the children to find some quotation marks and review why they are there. Do the same thing with an exclamation mark.
  • Invite the children to read and discover how the dragon's problem was solved.

FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES:

In addition to the follow-up activities below, the back cover of Dragon’s Friend has some excellent After Reading suggestions.

  • Do you think Joy Cowley gave the book a good title? Can you find another possible title on page 16? This will require the use of the understanding of the apostrophe.
  • Invite each child to write about a time that someone cared for him/her and helped solve a problem. Remind them that some of the words and spellings they need to use can be found in the book. The writings could be illustrated and compiled into a book for the classroom library.

Next week, I will conclude this blog series by examining one last book and offering tips for teacher reflection after the guided reading group meeting.

~~~

Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from our Kaleidoscope Collection. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children. 

~~~

Click the left image below to download an information sheet with key features about the Kaleidoscope Collection, which contains Buddy Boy and His Skateboard and books written by Geraldine Haggard. Click the rigth image below to download an information sheet about Joy Cowley Early Birds, which contains Dragon's Friend.

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Topics: Joy Cowley Early Birds, Leveled Readers, Kaleidoscope Collection, Geraldine Haggard, Guided Reading, Book Introductions

Book Introductions With Guided Reading Groups

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Sep 13, 2016 3:32:00 PM

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This is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. It is the first in a series about utilizing book introductions to help guided reading groups develop their reading strategies.

Book introductions are an important tool to help guided reading groups practice and develop their reading strategies. When presenting a new book to the group, teachers can present a preview of the book, pointing out new vocabulary and drawing attention to the pictures. Today’s blog focuses on the importance of book introductions. In later blogs, I will share examples of book introductions for three books at three levels of difficulty.

WHY ARE BOOK INTRODUCTIONS IMPORTANT FOR GUIDED READING GROUPS?

The following reasons for the use of book introductions come from my Reading Recovery training and from my experiences in working with Reading Recovery students and tutoring children the past fifteen years:

A good book introduction helps children comprehend and become more fluent in the reading of the text. The readers need to know what the book is about. Setting a purpose for reading is important.

  • With an introduction, the teacher can scaffold and strengthen strategies used by successful readers.
  • Research tells us that young readers profit from talking about strategies they are beginning to use. Why is the strategy successful? What do they do as they use the strategy? When do they use it? Your introduction will serve as a model for their use.
  • The book introduction makes the first reading more successful and prevents the feeling that reading is difficult. This understanding can become the motivation for students to read more.
  • The teacher can introduce new language and encourage strategy usage when students come to an unknown word. (Multiple meaning words, names of characters, and/or verb tenses not used by students in oral language, etc.)
  • Young students cannot introduce a new book independently to others before they read. Your modeling can help them develop this skill as they grow as readers.
  • The book introduction is an opportunity for the teacher to support students at their "cutting edge" and to provide readiness for entry to higher level strategies.

 

story_children_000015576714_kali9.jpgSELECTION OF THE NEW BOOK

The first important guideline is to determine the common independent reading level of the guided reading group. Observing the children reading, running records, and recognizing oral language patterns that the children use can help you select a book that everyone will be able to read independently with 90 - 94 percent accuracy.

Explore two or three possible books at the level you feel is correct to use. Select some books that you think your students will enjoy and that they have strategies to use as they meet some new words.

Spend some time reading the books you have identified as appropriate for the group. Make sure you understand what is happening in the book, what new language is presented in the book and the presence of new sight words that will require decoding strategies. Think about the role of the pictures in the book and how they can be used to plant language and determine meaning. What strategies do you see your students using already that you do not need to include in your introduction?

Remember that placement in a guided reading group does not have to be a permanent placement. Some students will progress in their independent reading level and can move to another group. A running record can help you make the right decision about placement. Also consider rate and fluency as you make the decision.

 

ADVICE WHEN INTRODUCING A BOOK

Here are some tips for you to follow in order to effectively introduce a new book:

  • Be excited about the book as you introduce it. If the students desire to read the book, they can demonstrate the use of strategies and good fluency.
  • Be sure each child has a copy of the book to use during the introduction.
  • Provide just enough help. Expect students to use some of their developing strategies and those they are using independently.
  • Don't make you introduction too long. There needs to be enough time for the first reading and the use of new information given in the introduction.

Next week, I will share more ideas about effective book introductions for guided reading books. Make sure to check back to this blog for updates!

~~~

Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from our Kaleidoscope Collection. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children. 

~~~

Click the image below to download an information sheet with key features about the Kaleidoscope Collection, which contains books written by Geraldine Haggard.

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Topics: Leveled Readers, Geraldine Haggard, Guided Reading, Book Introductions

Using Leveled Books to Help Students Develop Positive Behavioral Skills, Part 4

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Jul 21, 2016 3:30:00 PM

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This is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. It is the fourth and last in a series about using leveled books to teach the importance of good citizenship and classroom behavior. Click here to read the first post, second post, and third post.

In this series of blog posts, I have been looking at the use of guided-reading-leveled books in the early grades to help young students develop positive behavioral skills. Today, I will conclude the series by looking at No Rules from the Kaleidoscope Collection. By reading Friends Are Fun, At School, A Bad Day, and No Rules, your students can become good citizens at school while developing their literacy skills at the same time.

Book Four: NO RULES

Remind the children that for several days, they have been discussing ways that good friendship leads to good school experiences. Use the chart prepared at the last session that shares ways to prevent a bad day.

Display the cover of the book, No Rules. Introduce the grandmother and her granddaughter. Ask students for examples of things they do with a family member and why they enjoy the activities.

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Pages 25:

  • Were rules necessary for everyone to enjoy the activities in the story?
  • Do you think the grandmother and granddaughter in the story need rules? What might those rules be?
  • What is a rule?

Pages 68:

As they hear the story ending, students will understand why the grandmother felt the need for a rule. Provide an opportunity for them to offer comments about what they heard. Reread the last page to help the children compose a rule:

  • What rule do you think the grandmother thought was needed? 

 

The two in the story were at the grandmother's home. Remind the students that you previously asked them think about rules that are necessary at school. List these responses on the board or on a transparency. If the children need help responding, the following scenarios could be shared. After each, the children can suggest results of the scenario and a corresponding rule:

  • Janet sees her friend, Sue leave to go to the restroom. She decides to go and visit with Sue in the restroom.
  • William does not listen to the teacher when she explains an activity, so he does not know where to go and what to do.
  • Jane talked while the teacher read a story, so the teacher had to stop the story. During group activities, Jane also talks while other students are talking.
  • Jimmy's teacher takes out the supplies needed for an art activity. Jimmy does not want to share and grabs something from Joe's hand. Joe becomes angry, and the teacher has to talk to the two boys.

Ask the children to raise a hand if they understand the reasoning behind the rules. After recording and reading the rules from the children, explain that you want the children to follow these rules. Remind them that you will be watching and will be proud of those who follow the rules. They will be helping you and others enjoy the classroom.

On following days, recognize and praise individuals, groups of children, and the entire class when you see one of these rules being followed. At least once a week, read the rules with the students and remind them of the importance of each rule. Other rules can be added as the need for more guidance is seen in the classroom. Involve the students' wording of each new rule and ask them to think about why the rule it is needed. 

In summary, remember the importance of the classroom environment and your role in making the classroom a happy and safe place. Research tells us that students in well-managed classrooms have more friends, score in higher percentiles on achievement tests, and become caring and fruitful students as they progress through the school years.

This concludes my series of posts on using books to teach positive behavioral skills in young studnets. To go back to the first post in the series, click here. If you like what you've read here, you can see an archive of my earlier posts here! I contribute fairly frequently, so subscribe to the blog in the upper right sidebar to get my next series of posts delivered directly to your mailbox.

~~~

Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from our Kaleidoscope Collection. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children. 

~~~

Click the image below to download an information sheet with key features about the Kaleidoscope Collection, which contains the book mentioned in this post and books written by Geraldine Haggard.

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Topics: Leveled Readers, Reading Activities, Kaleidoscope Collection, Geraldine Haggard, Behavioral Skills

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