Hameray Classroom Literacy Blog!

Compound Word Activities

Posted by Sally Hosokawa on May 25, 2017 2:12:00 PM

A helpful decoding skill for new vocabulary is to determine whether or not the word is a compound word. If students recognize that some words are made up of two words strung together, it can help them easily pronounce and understand these (often long) and unfamiliar words!

The Common Core State Standards for Grade 2 requires students to “use knowledge of the meaning of individual words to predict the meaning of compound words (e.g. birdhouse, lighthouse, housefly; bookshelf, notebook, bookmark)” (L.2.4d). Although this standard is for 2nd Grade, recognizing compound words can be very useful for younger grade levels as well.

WHAT IS A COMPOUND WORD?

A compound word is made up of two or more words that, combined, create a new word. For example, the word “baseball” is made up of two discrete words, “base” and “ball.” There are technically three types of compounds: a closed compound, like “baseball,” has no spaces or hyphens between the words. A hyphenated compound, like “merry-go-round,” contains hyphens to create one word. Open compound words, like “ice cream,” contain a space between two words but are considered as one word with one meaning. For the purposes of teaching compounds words at the lower-elementary school and for decoding skills, it’s best to focus on teaching closed compound words.

COMPOUND WORD ACTIVITIES

The best way for students to understand the concept of a compound word is to expose them to many examples. Write individual words, such as “book” and “day,” on different index cards. Place them in two columns on the white board and ask students to make compound words out of the individual words. For example:

  • Can you add note and book together to make “notebook”?
  • Can you add note and day together to make “noteday”? (no)
  • What about “eye” and “glass”? What about “eye” and “day”?

After this activity, read Miniboy’s Travels from the Joy Cowley Collection. Have students identify all the compound words in the book:

  • Is Miniboy’s name a compound word? Which two words make up his name?
  • Why do you think “Miniboy” is named the way he is?
  • Is “strawberry” a compound word? Why do you think “berry” is combined with “straw”? [The Oxford Dictionary speculates that "straw" either refers to the stalk of the strawberry or the yellow straw-like spots on the berry.]
  • Is "bushes" a compound word? Although "bushes" can be divided into "bush" and "es," which makes the word plural, emphasize that it is not a compound word because "es" is not an individual word on its own. 

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>> CLICK HERE TO SEE THIS BOOK <<

Knowledge of compound words wil help students decode new words, leading to improved pronunciation and reading comprehension!

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Click the left image below to download information about Joy Cowley Collection, which features various titles about Miniboy

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Topics: Joy Cowley Collection, Common Core, Compound Words, Reading

Using Literacy Work Stations to Teach Compound Words—with FREE download!

Posted by Laureen on Jan 13, 2015 8:00:00 AM

This is a guest post by blogger Laureen. If you like what you see here, you can check out her blog, Teach with Laughter, for more of her writing.

Hi again! I’ve been enjoying my visits here on the Hameray Classroom Literacy Blog.  I enjoy creating engaging, hands-on literacy activities for my students and am delighted that I have been asked to share some of them here.

The last time I visited, I shared a writing activity that could be used with the Story World Real World Gingerbread Man set.  Each year, when I do a gingerbread theme in my classroom, I take the opportunity to do some review of compound words.  After all, gingerbread is the tastiest compound word I know!

Here is a word work literacy station that students can work at independently:

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Students will match the gingerbread cards to create compound words and the recording page will allow you to check for understanding.  I have included a student instruction card to build independence. 

I know I’ve said it before but you really should check out the Story World Real World series. 

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Laureen is a first-grade teacher in Canada. She has been teaching kindergarten and grade one for more than twenty years. Laureen loves to make learning fun and you can find her at her blog, Teach With Laughter. You can also visit her TPT page here.

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To learn more about Story World Real World, click here to visit our website, or click the series highlights image below to download information sheets with key features. To get today's free activity download, click the image to the right below!

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Topics: K-2 Literacy, Story World, Real World, Compound Words, Laureen

Using Mrs. Wishy-Washy to Teach Compound Words—with FREE Download!

Posted by Laureen on Mar 17, 2014 8:00:00 AM

This is a guest post by blogger Laureen. If you like what you see here, you can check out her blog, Teach with Laughter, for more of her writing.

Happy St. Patrick’s Day! It’s Laureen visiting again from Teach With Laughter. Today I’m going to share with you an idea that I use with my students as a follow-up to reading Joy Cowley’s Mrs. Wishy-Washy books.

Like you, when reading with my students I am constantly pointing out words, including compound words. You’ll find compound words in just about every book. For example, in Mrs. Wishy-Washy and the Big Tub you’ll find "sunshine," "afterward." and "everywhere," and in Mrs. Wishy-Washy’s Birthday there’s even one in the title!

As a follow up I created an engaging "I Spy" activity for students. Using a magnifying glass (who hasn’t met a child who loves them?) they will search for teeny-tiny words.

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Students need to combine words to create compound words and record them. For example they’ll find "cake" and "cup" to create "cupcake." I have included a student instruction sheet to keep students on task in a center, an "I Spy" picture page and a recording sheet.

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Make sure that you have a magnifying glass handy and watch the learning and the smiles happen!Thanks for reading my post and enjoy your freebie!!

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Laureen is a grade one teacher in Canada. She has been teaching kindergarten and grade one for 22 years, has two children, and enjoys creating hands-on learning activities for her classroom.  You can read about more of her activities at her blog Teach With Laughter.

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To learn more about the Joy Cowley Collection, click here to visit our website, or click the series highlights image below to download an information sheet with key features. To get today's free activity download (4 pages), click the compound unit image below!

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Topics: Mrs. Wishy-Washy, Joy Cowley, K-2 Literacy, Compound Words, Laureen

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