Hameray Classroom Literacy Blog!

Classic Post: Classroom Library Organization

Posted by Richard Giso on Oct 8, 2015 5:30:00 PM

Richard Giso 200This is a guest post by Richard Giso that originally ran in March 2014. Click here to see his other posts. You could also check out his blog, called Mr. Giso's Room to Read, in which he writes about fun classroom activities, behavior management, and classroom management.

Making the Most of Classroom Libraries

Greetings! It’s Rich Giso from Mr. Giso’s Room to Read, excited to be blogging about something both my college students and my teacher colleagues often seek my advice on. Setting up a classroom library can be a very daunting task, as there are so many questions to consider. How much space do I have? How should I categorize my books? Should I have certain books leveled? Where do I put those special readalouds I do every year? What makes the best storage? What kinds of print, other than books, should I include?

I’m hoping to offer you some pointers by sharing with you my classroom library via photographs. Keep in mind, however, that I’m in my sixteenth year of teaching, meaning that I have a vast collection of reading material available to my young readers that I have accumulated through the years. Start small. Your collection will grow from year to year with the help of yard sales, retiring teachers, eBay, bonus points from book orders, grant proposals, parent donations, etc.

Giso-8-1As far as book storage goes, I use a combination of dish washing tubs and plastic/metal coolers used to store ice in order to keep drinks cool. My tubs are all orange and blue so that they match my classroom theme. This serves to make things look both organized and uniform. ALL books should be stored with the covers facing out towards the reader. This is important for book browsing.

Notice how I have a combination of books sorted by level and by topic. This is really important. My young readers need to be picking from the right book level in order for them to grow stronger as readers. I give them a range of books to select from (a tub that is easy, one that is just right and one that is a little challenging). My mature readers have more freedom when selecting books, because they are more experienced in picking books that are a good fit for their interest and reading ability.

In addition to sorting books by levels, I have many categories that highlight Caldecott awards, poetry, science and mathematics books, wordless books, books on America, legends, fables and fairy tales, books from different cultures, wordless books, alphabet books, biographies and books about history.

I also have these shelves I turned on their sides to serve as benches. This is a perfect area for buddy reading.

Giso-8-3

For those special books—ones that I use on the holidays, ones that teach topics such as parts of speech, punctuation, etc. and my special readalouds, I utilize a shelf out of reach so that they are always there when I need them.

I have special spinning shelves for books arranged according to my favorite authors (Dr. Seuss, Eric Carle, Jan Brett, Bill Martin Jr., etc.). Periodically, I move them to a display that includes lots of photographs and biographic tidbits about our featured author. We are currently studying Patrica Polacco.

I have a number of informational texts and periodicals for kids as well as pamphlets, travel brochures and menus for them to browse. These have special places in my library too.

Giso-8-6Giso-8-7

For topics that we are studying, I pull out books and feature them as well. Here you see a Gail Gibbons collection because we are writing teaching books. In social studies we are studying American symbols, so I have those books on display.

Giso-8-8

In addition to these pictures, I store my dictionaries in my writing center and have a wire wrack display that showcases my holiday/seasonal books that changes on a regular basis. To store multiple copies of the same book, I have a guided reading cart on wheels so that they are easily accessible.

I’m pleased to offer you a “tour” of my library. It’s the heart of every classroom, so it’s work giving it some attention! Happy reading!

~~~

I'm a proud teacher with over 15 years of teaching experience. I began my teaching career as a fourth grade teacher at the Bates Elementary School in Salem, Massachusetts. Since then, I have taught fourth grade for eight years. From there, I moved to a job as a reading coach under the Reading First grant. Having missed my true passion—having a classroom of my own—I returned to teaching as a first grade teacher for the next five years.

Now I've moved to the Carlton Innovation School, also in Salem, Massachusetts, where I am ready to begin my first year as a member of a team of four teachers that teach grades one and two. In addition, I teach undergraduate and graduate students at Salem State University. My courses involve literacy, children's literature, and elementary education. My educational interests include early literacy, effective reading interventions, and positive classroom climates.

~~~

To download a brochure on our pre-packaged Classroom Libraries, click the image below!

Classroom Library Brochure

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Topics: Classroom Libraries, Richard Giso, K-2 Literacy, Classroom Organization

Literacy Tip: Puzzle Piece Match-Ups

Posted by Richard Giso on Apr 11, 2014 11:02:00 AM

Richard Giso 200This is a guest post by Richard Giso, an occasional contributor to our blog. Click here to see his earlier posts, and check back here on our Classroom Literacy blog frequently to see if he's got a new post up! You could also check out his blog, called Mr. Giso's Room to Read, in which he writes about fun classroom activities, behavior management, and classroom management.

Hello again, It’s Rich from Mr. Giso’s Room to Read. I’m back with another idea to add to your “literacy toolbox.” As always, this tip it teacher tested and approved by yours truly.

Are you looking for an easy way to reinforce a feature of informational text and boost your readers’ comprehension? Try this activity. You will need a nonfiction reader (with an index in the back), a scissors, a writing tool, and some index cards.

This project is a terrific follow up after a guided reading lesson. Begin by referring readers back to the index. Have them select a certain number of key topics listed in the index. I use many titles from the Download series for this. They are perfect for my advanced second-grade readers. Even my most reluctant readers gravitate towards these titles in my library.

Divide index cards in half. I like to get a little creative so that they resemble puzzle pieces. See these examples below. They have some key words from an index on them.

Giso_9-2

Using the book’s index, readers look up a set number of key words or phrases and put together a sentence or two that defines them. The index will help your readers navigate through the text. In this example below, my reader today put on one side the term “hedgehog” (listed in the index) with the phrase “eats at night” (evidence from the text).

Giso_9-3

Repeat this for many index cards. Then, have students cut the pieces and place them in a bag. For follow up, have readers swap books and bags of puzzle pieces. Partners reassemble the index card halves as they read to monitor their comprehension of the text. With spring in the air, I developed this strategy to keep my readers motivated and attentive to important terms while reading. Have fun with this literacy tip.

~~~

I'm a proud teacher with over 15 years of teaching experience. I began my teaching career as a fourth grade teacher at the Bates Elementary School in Salem, Massachusetts. Since then, I have taught fourth grade for eight years. From there, I moved to a job as a reading coach under the Reading First grant. Having missed my true passion—having a classroom of my own—I returned to teaching as a first grade teacher for the next five years.

Now I've moved to the Carlton Innovation School, also in Salem, Massachusetts, where I am ready to begin my first year as a member of a team of four teachers that teach grades one and two. In addition, I teach undergraduate and graduate students at Salem State University. My courses involve literacy, children's literature, and elementary education. My educational interests include early literacy, effective reading interventions, and positive classroom climates.

~~~

For more information on the Download series, which was used in this activity, click here to visit our website, or click the series highlights image below to download an information sheet with key features.

Download Series Highlights

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Topics: Richard Giso, Informational Text, Download, Reluctant Readers

The Importance of the Classroom Library

Posted by Elizabeth Hall on Apr 7, 2014 8:00:00 AM

elizabeth hallThis is a guest post by blogger Elizabeth Hall. If you like what you see here, you can check out her blog, Kickin' It in Kindergarten, for more of her writing, or you can click here to see her other contributions to our blog!

When I was in fourth grade, I remember my teacher having the best classroom library. She had pillows, a colorful rug, and a loft filled with books. If we finished our work, she would let us crawl up to the loft with a book and read. I’ve taken that reading memory with me into my own classroom. I am not able to have a loft (fire code!) but I have found ways to make our library inviting and accessible for my students.

My thought is every classroom library should have these four things: leveled books, thematic books, books by author and books for Reader’s Workshop.

I know that is a lot to think about. If you can level organize your library so that you can find a way to incorporate all of these components, it will make your life so much easier! I have my classroom library sectioned off into a big corner by a bright, large window. Since I can’t have a loft, I’ve put a beanbag and pillows under the counter so it seems like a little nook. My parents had a sofa that they no longer wanted, so I was able to use that in my classroom library as well.

securedownload-1-200 securedownload-4-200 securedownload-2-200

The library is organized with the leveled library being the closest to my reading table. Students shop for leveled books each week to bring back and forth from school to home. In the yellow baskets, they can find books that are by topic. For example, I have a basket on sports. If they want to read a basketball story, then they know to look in that basket. The white baskets are organized by author. I also was intentional with putting my word wall above my library this year. It used to be clear across the room and now I feel like they are actually able to use it as a resource!

securedownload-3-300 securedownload-5-300-1

Maybe you just want a little facelift for your library or maybe you are a new teacher and you are looking for ways to make your library a space where students can curl up to read. You can pull the basket cards off the internet, or you can make your own. Find a space in your room that is dedicated just for reading!

~~~

Author Bio

This is my fifth year as a kindergarten teacher. The best part of kindergarten is watching a child fall in love with reading. It has become my passion to show children the possibilities and amazing adventures literature can offer. I love watching their eyes light up when they tell me they can read their favorite book, or they can’t wait to go back to the library! I have the best job in the world!

I am so lucky to have such a wonderful support system in and out of school. My family lives close and I get to spend a lot of time with them! While I am not at school, I enjoy running, teaching spin class, swimming, playing kickball, spending time with my husband, and traveling. I also have a sheltie named Maggie, which is spoiled rotten. I am married to the best guy in the world, work with wonderful people, and have fabulous students!

  ~~~

We're pleased to offer ready-made classroom libraries to supplement your collection! Click here to see them on our website, or click the image below to download a brochure!

Classroom Library Brochure

 

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Topics: Classroom Libraries, K-2 Literacy, Kindergarten, Elizabeth Hall

Classroom Library Organization

Posted by Richard Giso on Mar 21, 2014 10:45:00 AM

Richard Giso 200This is a guest post by Richard Giso, an occasional contributor to our blog. Click here to see his earlier posts, and check back here on our Classroom Literacy blog frequently to see if he's got a new post up! You could also check out his blog, called Mr. Giso's Room to Read, in which he writes about fun classroom activities, behavior management, and classroom management.

Making the Most of Classroom Libraries

Greetings! It’s Rich Giso from Mr. Giso’s Room to Read, excited to be blogging about something both my college students and my teacher colleagues often seek my advice on. Setting up a classroom library can be a very daunting task, as there are so many questions to consider. How much space do I have? How should I categorize my books? Should I have certain books leveled? Where do I put those special readalouds I do every year? What makes the best storage? What kinds of print, other than books, should I include? I’m hoping to offer you some pointers by sharing with you my classroom library via photographs. Keep in mind, however, that I’m in my sixteenth year of teaching, meaning that I have a vast collection of reading material available to my young readers that I have accumulated through the years. Start small. Your collection will grow from year to year with the help of yard sales, retiring teachers, eBay, bonus points from book orders, grant proposals, parent donations, etc.

Giso-8-1As far as book storage goes, I use a combination of dish washing tubs and plastic/metal coolers used to store ice in order to keep drinks cool. My tubs are all orange and blue so that they match my classroom theme. This serves to make things look both organized and uniform. ALL books should be stored with the covers facing out towards the reader. This is important for book browsing. Notice how I have a combination of books sorted by level and by topic. This is really important. My young readers need to be picking from the right book level in order for them to grow stronger as readers. I give them a range of books to select from (a tub that is easy, one that is just right and one that is a little challenging). My mature readers have more freedom when selecting books, because they are more experienced in picking books that are a good fit for their interest and reading ability.

In addition to sorting books by levels, I have many categories that highlight Caldecott awards, poetry, science and mathematics books, wordless books, books on America, legends, fables and fairy tales, books from different cultures, wordless books, alphabet books, biographies and books about history.

I also have these shelves I turned on their sides to serve as benches. This is a perfect area for buddy reading.

Giso-8-3

For those special books—ones that I use on the holidays, ones that teach topics such as parts of speech, punctuation, etc. and my special readalouds, I utilize a shelf out of reach so that they are always there when I need them.

I have special spinning shelves for books arranged according to my favorite authors (Dr. Seuss, Eric Carle, Jan Brett, Bill Martin Jr., etc.). Periodically, I move them to a display that includes lots of photographs and biographic tidbits about our featured author. We are currently studying Patrica Polacco.

I have a number of informational texts and periodicals for kids as well as pamphlets, travel brochures and menus for them to browse. These have special places in my library too.

Giso-8-6Giso-8-7

For topics that we are studying, I pull out books and feature them as well. Here you see a Gail Gibbons collection because we are writing teaching books. In social studies we are studying American symbols, so I have those books on display.

Giso-8-8

In addition to these pictures, I store my dictionaries in my writing center and have a wire wrack display that showcases my holiday/seasonal books that changes on a regular basis. To store multiple copies of the same book, I have a guided reading cart on wheels so that they are easily accessible.

I’m pleased to offer you a “tour” of my library. It’s the heart of every classroom, so it’s work giving it some attention! Happy reading!

~~~

I'm a proud teacher with over 15 years of teaching experience. I began my teaching career as a fourth grade teacher at the Bates Elementary School in Salem, Massachusetts. Since then, I have taught fourth grade for eight years. From there, I moved to a job as a reading coach under the Reading First grant. Having missed my true passion—having a classroom of my own—I returned to teaching as a first grade teacher for the next five years.

Now I've moved to the Carlton Innovation School, also in Salem, Massachusetts, where I am ready to begin my first year as a member of a team of four teachers that teach grades one and two. In addition, I teach undergraduate and graduate students at Salem State University. My courses involve literacy, children's literature, and elementary education. My educational interests include early literacy, effective reading interventions, and positive classroom climates.

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Topics: Classroom Libraries, Richard Giso, K-2 Literacy, Classroom Organization

Celebrate Black History with Biographies—with FREE Download!

Posted by Dana Lester on Feb 21, 2014 8:00:00 AM

This is a guest blog post by Dana Lester, who writes a blog called Common to the Core, in which she writes about the Common Core State Standards, student reading skills, behavior management, books and products, and more. Dana is writing a series of guest posts; to see her other contributions, you can click here!

Using Biographies to Celebrate Black History Month

Lester 5 1 200This month I set up a display of books on famous black Americans to bring attention to Black History Month. My students have loved this display. It’s brought to light many books that were tucked away on a shelf that might not have been noticed in awhile.

I also have a few biographies from the Hameray Biography Series, which are my favorite. They are not in my library circulation, because they are paperback, but they get plenty of use in the library. I like them because the reading level is third to fifth grade, there are many colored photos throughout, and there is an index, timeline, glossary, and list of other resources in the back of each book. The timeline is a perfect reference for projects and the “Learn More” resource list is a perfect addition because it lists other books, videos, and websites!

My students like these biographies because of the color pictures and photos. I think they also like the fact that they are small and paperback. Paperback books just feel more informal and Lester 5 2 200fun. The reading level these books are written on is perfect for third grade and beyond. The text is interesting and has a conversational feel to it rather than textbook language. There are fun facts throughout each book. There are thirty titles in this series and I am super excited about the Teacher’s Guide that is coming out soon! If you are in need of biographies your students will WANT to read, look no further! This series is a hit in my library!

We spent a week focused on biographies. Each student chose one person and used information from all the biographies I had on that person to complete a biography research report. The students who used my Hameray books had a much easier time understanding the information and filling out their report organizer. Look below to download the report organizer my students used in creating their reports!

~~~

Dana LesterDana Lester received a B.S. and Master’s Degree from Middle Tennessee State University and is currently teaching at Walter Hill School in Murfreesboro, TN. Dana is also a Common Core Coach with the Tennessee State Department of Education. She has 12 years of classroom experience and has just begun her role as Library Media Specialist. As a strong advocate of the Common Core Standards and Whole Brain Teaching strategies, she engages her students in hands-on, inquiry based learning and shares many ideas and activities on her blog, Common to the Core. She was named Teacher of the Year at Walter Hill in 2013.

~~~

To download the Biography Research Organizer, click the worksheet image below. To learn more about the Biography Series, you can click here to visit our website, or click the series highlights image below to download an information sheet with key features.

Biography Research Organizer Download Biography Series Highlights

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Topics: Classroom Libraries, Informational Text, Dana Lester, Biography Series

Spotlight! Tips for Classroom Management with Richard Giso!

Posted by Richard Giso on Sep 13, 2013 8:00:00 AM

describe the image
Richard Giso 200Welcome once again to our Teacher Spotlight, giving recognition (and free books!) to deserving teachers who have great ideas to share. Today's featured teacher is Richard Giso of Salem, MA. He writes a blog called Mr. Giso's Room to Read, in which he writes about fun classroom activities, behavior management, and classroom management.

In addition to coming to stand in our Spotlight, Richard has agreed to write a series of guests posts for us, so be on the lookout for more content from him coming soon, right here on our Classroom Literacy blog. Today, he is sharing with us some of his classroom management tips and ideas, developed over his fifteen-plus years of teaching experience.

Classroom Management

I am often asked how my classroom runs like a “well-oiled machine.” My response always notes how important the first few weeks of school are in setting a positive, yet well-managed, tone for the remainder of the school year. Without establishing clear expectations starting day one, a teacher is setting his or her classroom up for a year of potentially ineffective instruction. I’m pleased to have a chance to share some of my strategies in this Teacher’s Spotlight.

Mr. Giso’s Top 10 Tips for a Well-Managed Classroom

1. Be as FIRM and as STRICT as you can be from day one—especially for new teachers. You can always “ease up on the reins” as you move through the year, but you will never “tighten them up” successfully midyear. You are not your students’ friends; you are their teacher. Don’t worry—in the end, they will still love you.

2. Establish a routine for everything, starting on the first day of school. This includes daily before-school work, walking in the halls, sharpening a pencil, getting supplies, using the bathrooms, assembling on the rug, using your classroom library, placing the date on written work, unpacking snacks, turning in homework, taking attendance, collecting lunch money, dismissal—EVERYTHING!

3. Develop classroom rules and expectations as a community on the first day of school. Phrase words in a positive manner. Instead of “No running!” use “We will walk.” Have them numbered and posted in a central location by the second day. Don’t forget them! When a student breaks a rule, bring him or her to the rule board for a discussion. Send the rules home to parents the first week, so that they know your expectations, too.

ClassRules

4. Establish fair and logical consequences for breaking rules beforehand, and communicate this to children AND to families. They should always know what to expect for which behaviors. This avoids making a threat that is not possible to follow thorough. Avoid surprises.

5. Be careful with rewards. Way too often, children expect to get something for behaving. Make good behavior the norm—the expectation. Avoid bribing at all costs. Children need to behave because that is what is expected of them. This is not to say that offering raffle tickets for a raffle at the end of the week or having children have their own mini-banks to save up for a class store is a bad idea, just don’t overdo it. Keep candy at home. It has no place being handed out for rewards in the classroom.

6. Give your class’s line behavior extra attention. Your students’ behavior in line is a mirror image of their behavior in your classroom. The only difference is that, in line, you have NO door to close. Quiet voices, hands by sides, facing forward, etc., must be reinforced daily. Have a “mystery walker.” Pick a random student each day (popsicle sticks work great to draw names). At the end of the day, announce that student’s name, discuss his or her line behavior, and reward accordingly.

7. Half of your class should not be on daily behavior reports. First of all, who has time to complete these during the course of your busy day? Spend your time on your curriculum and lesson planning. Only send home behavior reports on an extreme basis, such as a student having a legal documented need, going through an unusual hard time at both school and at home, or being unable to get a student to comply despite all your efforts, etc. Make the behavior report easy (rubrics work best), and always include a behavior to rate that you know the student will be successful at displaying. Parents must be on board, too, otherwise it’s a lost cause.

8. Plan how you wish to monitor the level of talking, or lack thereof, in your classroom. Implement a nonverbal sign for quieting down like holding up the “peace" sign. Have a “Noise Gauge” which lets students know what their voices should sound like throughout the day: whisper voice, speak up voice, no voice, 3 inch voice, etc. Also make a “Noise-O-Meter” to monitor noise level throughout the day. Is you classroom too noisy, could it be better, or is it just right?

NoiseGaugeNoiseOMeter

9. Move around often, and have your students move around often! If you have a distracted student or a group being chatty, move your body close to them—your body’s proximity, without even needing to speak, can do wonders. Also let students move around as often as possible. Use carpet samples to let them use the floor, have plenty of side tables around the perimeter of your room, and have a large carpet for whole class meetings, etc. Do a stretch between long lessons, something like Simon Says, the Chicken Dance, the Macarena, he Hokey Pokey, etc. I recently purchased those gymnastic twirling ribbons to have my students wave them around to classical music. They love them.

10. Establish a classroom community. Celebrate classroom spirit. Always focus on the positive. Arrange the desks in small groups. Make EVERY child have a classroom job that rotates each week. Explicitly teach character education, explicitly role model what it means to be a good friend, etc. Remind children that when they misbehave, it brings down the whole community. Use peer pressure to your advantage! Always remember to point out positives and devote your attention to them. Statements such as “I like how Joe is being a good friend by picking up the paper that Cara dropped on the floor,” and “I’m so proud to see Shane not talking when Winston is trying to get his attention during our math lesson,” are more effective at managing a classroom than “Stop talking right now,” or “Stop dropping your pencil.”

With these helpful tips you are ready to a successful tone for a great school year. Good luck!

- Richard Giso

~~~

describe the imageI'm a proud teacher with over 15 years of teaching experience. I began my teaching career as a fourth grade teacher at the Bates Elementary School in Salem, Massachusetts. Since then, I have taught fourth grade for eight years. From there, I moved to a job as a reading coach under the Reading First grant. Having missed my true passion—having a classroom of my own—I returned to teaching as a first grade teacher for the next five years.

Now I've moved to the Carlton Innovation School, also in Salem, Massachusetts, where I am ready to begin my first year as a member of a team of four teachers that teach grades one and two. In addition, I teach undergraduate and graduate students at Salem State University. My courses involve literacy, children's literature, and elementary education. My educational interests include early literacy, effective reading interventions, and positive classroom climates. Click the image to check out my blog!

~~~

Do you know a K–8 teacher whose creative classroom activities could use some well-deserved recognition? Have you, yourself, hit upon a strategy that you think works so well that you'd love to share it with others? Do you have a teaching blog or website with ideas you'd like to spread? Come stand in our teacher spotlight!

We're looking for teachers with unique, fun perspectives to feature on our blog. At least once a month, possibly more often, we want to inspire the teaching community with the innovative work of teachers who have a true passion for what they're doing. We'll broadcast your ideas here on our blog, distributing them through social media such as Facebook and Twitter.

Each teacher we choose will get some Hameray "goodies" from a series that fits their classroom needs—early literacy, oral language development, striving readers in upper grades, informational text, or narrative texts.

To nominate yourself or another teacher, tell us a little more here.

- Tara Rodriquez

Read More

Topics: Teacher Spotlight, Classroom Libraries, Richard Giso

Spotlight! Taking a Look at Classroom Libraries with Lyssa Sahadevan

Posted by Lyssa Sahadevan on Aug 23, 2013 9:00:00 AM

Lyssa SahadevanWelcome once again to our Teacher Spotlight, giving recognition (and free books!) to deserving teachers who have great ideas to share. Today's featured teacher is Lyssa Sahadevan of Marietta, GA. She writes a blog called My Mommy Reads in which she writes about motherhood and teaching-related topics, such as classroom management. Sometimes, she even has giveaways! Lyssa is here to share some ideas about different ways classroom libraries can be organized.

If you're interested in classroom libraries, we offer six sets that are divided by reading level. You can find out more about them by clicking here!

Classroom Libraries

No matter how many books you have or what grade level you teach, organizing your books should be a priority! It saves you instructional time and makes life easier for you AND your students!

So what is the best way to organize books? Levels? Genres? Author? Fiction/Informational? My answer is a good mix of everything. But I think the correct answer is whatever works for you and your students!

You might choose to sort your books at the beginning of the year with your students or you may sort them ahead of time. I do a little of both, and then everyone helps sort the books into their correct baskets. When we receive books throughout the year, we let partners decide where the book should be placed. Involving students (readers) in the classroom library decision-making empowers them and builds their sense of ownership.

However you decide to sort, and I know it is a big decision, start today. If you want to level your books, ask for parent volunteers or work with a colleague. Building a classroom library that works will take time, but is absolutely worth it!

Here are a few examples of up and running classroom libraries in grades K–2:

IMG 9860

1st grade: Leveled books are available for students for at home reading.

 

IMG 9861

1st grade: Books are sorted by theme. This tub features fiction and informational books about weather.

 

IMG 9862

1st grade: Tubs sorted by topic. Informational baskets come in handy during research!

 

IMG 9863

1st grade: Books are sorted by author and/or character. Character studies and author studies are a snap when your tubs are ready!

 

IMG 9864

1st grade: Leveled readers for guided reading.

 

IMG 9865

1st grade: Seasonal tubs for read alouds!

 

IMG 9866

2nd grade: Chapter books are sorted by series.

 

IMG 9867

2nd grade: Informational tubs with abbreviations that are also written inside each book for easy return.

 

IMG 9870

2nd grade: Books sorted by topic (animals/fiction and tv shows/comics) may also be leveled by topic within their basket.

 

IMG 9871 IMG 9872

Kindergarten: Leveled readers for small-group instruction.

 

IMG 9873

Kindergarten: Books sorted by genre, placed at student level for easy access.

- Lyssa Sahadevan

~~~

Lyssa Sahadevan Blog ScreenshotLyssa Sahadevan is a first grade teacher in Marietta, GA. She loves reader's and writer's workshop, is a former Teacher of the Year, and shares ideas at www.mymommyreads.com.

~~~

Do you know a K-8 teacher whose creative classroom activities could use some well-deserved recognition? Have you, yourself, hit upon a strategy that you think works so well that you'd love to share it with others? Do you have a teaching blog or website with ideas you'd like to spread? Come stand in our teacher spotlight!

We're looking for teachers with unique, fun perspectives to feature on our blog. At least once a month, possibly more often, we want to inspire the teaching community with the innovative work of teachers who have a true passion for what they're doing. We'll broadcast your ideas here on our blog, distributing them through social media such as Facebook and Twitter.

Each teacher we choose will get some Hameray "goodies" from a series that fits their classroom needs—early literacy, oral language development, striving readers in upper grades, informational text, or narrative texts.

To nominate yourself or another teacher, tell us a little more here.

- Tara Rodriquez

Read More

Topics: Teacher Spotlight, Classroom Libraries, Lyssa Sahadevan

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