Hameray Classroom Literacy Blog!

Book Introductions With Guided Reading Groups, Part 3

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Sep 27, 2016 3:45:00 PM

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This is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. It is the third and last post in a series about utilizing book introductions to help guided reading groups develop their reading strategies. To read the first post (introduction), click here. To read the second post, click here.

This blog series focuses on the importance of book introductions in guided reading groups. Today, I will conclude this series by examining a Level I book, The Ungrateful Tiger, and provide an opportunity for teacher reflection after giving a book introduction to guided reading groups.

BOOK THREE: THE UNGRATEFUL TIGER

Series: Fables and the Real World. Guided Reading Level: I (i). Genre: Fable.

PREPARATION:

  • You might want to remind the children of the definition of a fable.
  • The word "ungrateful" has both a prefix and a suffix. The multi-meaning word 'fair' is also a key word throughout the story and the group needs to understand what it means in the story.

 

INTRODUCTION:

  • Distribute the books. Ask the children to notice the word in green at the top of the front cover. Remind them of a fable that you know they are familiar with and how it teaches a lesson. Explain that this book does the same thing.
  • Read the title to the children. Ask them to frame the first and last syllables and find that 'un' means 'not' and 'ful' means 'full.’ They can predict that 'ungrateful' means 'not being full of thanks.’
  • Ask the children to study the pictures and meet the main characters in the story (the boy, the tiger, and the owl).
  • Ask the children to turn to page 8 and study the picture and frame the word 'pounced.’ How does the picture help them determine the meaning of 'pounced’? Remind them that the pictures can provide clues for meaning as they read the story.
  • Remind the students that they should think about this fable’s lesson while they read. Who learned the lesson? Remember to discuss this question after the first reading.

FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES:

  • After the first reading, a second reading could be done as a reader's theater. The teacher can be the narrator and students read the conversations of the men, the tiger, and the owl. This reading can demonstrate knowledge of traits and emotions of the characters.
  • The book also is a good tool for discussing cause and effect. Why did the men dig the pit? Why did the tiger cry for help? Why did the boy help the tiger out of the pit? What happened because the boy got the tiger out of the pit? Why did the owl know what was happening between the boy and the tiger?
  • You can read another fable to the children or provide fables that they can read with 95 percent accuracy or better. Children can also share a fable they read in the past and why it was a fable.

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SOME CLOSING THOUGHTS FOR TEACHER AFTER THE FIRST READING

  • Do you think your introduction helped the children more fluently use a strategy they are developing or use a new strategy for the first time?
  • Was the reading rate appropriate?
  • Did the children exhibit some feelings or facial and vocal emotions that demonstrated their understanding of character emotions? Did they use the punctuation marks as clues to understanding the character traits and feelings?
  • Did the students demonstrate a need for a reading strategy that you didn’t introduce? Think about that strategy as you plan the introduction of the next book.
  • Remember that multiple readings of a book are important. The students can reread the book at home. The book can be placed in the class library for even more readings. Help your parents understand the importance of the re-readings.

As you use carefully planned book introductions, you will find your readers improving their use of strategies and becoming more independent readers. Selecting just the right book and identifying what support the group needs to read a new book will help students improve their reading strategies, fluency, and reading rate.

~~~

Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from our Kaleidoscope Collection. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children. 

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Click the left image below to download an information sheet with key features about Fables and the Real World, which contains the book featured in this article.

Fables and the Real World More Information

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Topics: Leveled Readers, Geraldine Haggard, Guided Reading, Fables and the Real World, Book Introductions

Book Introductions With Guided Reading Groups, Part 2

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Sep 20, 2016 2:50:00 PM

GHaggardbiopic

This is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. It is the second in a series about utilizing book introductions to help guided reading groups develop their reading strategies. To read the first post, click here.

The first blog in this series included reasons to use book introductions in a guided reading group setting. I also included hints for selection of a “just right book” and tips on teacher preparation for the introduction. Today's blog shares examples of effective book introductions for two differently-leveled Hameray titles: Buddy Boy and His Skateboard and Dragon's Friend.

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BOOK ONE: BUDDY BOY AND HIS SKATEBOARD

Series: Kaleidoscope Collection. Guided reading level: E. Genre: Narrative.

PREPARATION:

Imagine that your guided reading groups includes children who were not reading with fluency. As you read Buddy Boy and His Skateboard, you feel that the quotations in the book could be used to help children read more fluently and recognize the use of the quotation marks.

There are three compound words in the story: 'someone,' 'skateboard,' and 'grandma.' You predict that the children can use the pictures and meaning cues to determine the two latter words, but you decide to introduce the word 'someone' in your introduction.

BOOK INTRODUCTION:

  • Distribute the books. Ask the children to study the cover and meet Buddy Boy. Where is he? How do you think he feels about the skateboard? As we read the story we will discover how he enjoys the skateboard, and how something sad almost happens to him.
  • Ask the children to look through the pictures and decide who the other characters in the book are.
  • Use page 3 to introduce the quotation marks. Model what Mom said with expression and ask the children to read the two lines of conversation with you. Remind them to read all the quotations in the story in that way. You might emphasize the word 'Please.’
  • Now we are ready to read and find out what happens to Buddy Boy and his skateboard.
  • Watch and listen as the children do the first reading of the book. Did they read with fluency?

FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES

Follow up the reading with these discussion questions:

  • Why does Buddy Boy have the skateboard in bed with him?
  • What lesson do you think Buddy Boy learned?
  • Why do you think his dad threatened to take his skateboard?

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BOOK TWO: DRAGON'S FRIEND

Series: Joy Cowley Early Birds. Guided Reading Level: G. Genre: Narrative.

PREPARATION:

Three notable punctuation marks appear in the book. The apostrophes make the word a possessive. The quotation and exclamation marks can help students read with greater fluency and expression and understand the characters’ emotions.

Multiple-meaning words also appear in the book. Page 2 introduces the word 'poor.’ Page 10 introduces the word 'scales.' The picture on the two pages can help the children understand the meanings of these words. The word 'cared' on page 14 is important to help the students understand why the dragon decides he has friends.

INTRODUCTION:

  • Distribute the books. Ask the children to study the front cover. Read the title with the children. Why do you think the dragon is crying? How many dragons are in the picture? Why does the word “Dragon's” contain an apostrophe? Explain its meaning.
  • Use the title page to meet the other characters in the story. Where might they be? Why are they looking down? What do you think they may find?
  • Ask the children to read the first line on page 2. Encourage them to use the picture and discuss the idea of the dragon being 'poor.' Go to page 14 and use the double picture to discover the meaning of the word 'cared.' The readers need to understand why the children helped the dragon.
  • Ask the children to find some quotation marks and review why they are there. Do the same thing with an exclamation mark.
  • Invite the children to read and discover how the dragon's problem was solved.

FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES:

In addition to the follow-up activities below, the back cover of Dragon’s Friend has some excellent After Reading suggestions.

  • Do you think Joy Cowley gave the book a good title? Can you find another possible title on page 16? This will require the use of the understanding of the apostrophe.
  • Invite each child to write about a time that someone cared for him/her and helped solve a problem. Remind them that some of the words and spellings they need to use can be found in the book. The writings could be illustrated and compiled into a book for the classroom library.

Next week, I will conclude this blog series by examining one last book and offering tips for teacher reflection after the guided reading group meeting.

~~~

Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from our Kaleidoscope Collection. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children. 

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Click the left image below to download an information sheet with key features about the Kaleidoscope Collection, which contains Buddy Boy and His Skateboard and books written by Geraldine Haggard. Click the rigth image below to download an information sheet about Joy Cowley Early Birds, which contains Dragon's Friend.

Kaleidoscope Collection Info Sheet                   New Call-to-Action

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Topics: Joy Cowley Early Birds, Leveled Readers, Kaleidoscope Collection, Geraldine Haggard, Guided Reading, Book Introductions

Book Introductions With Guided Reading Groups

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Sep 13, 2016 3:32:00 PM

GHaggardbiopic

This is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. It is the first in a series about utilizing book introductions to help guided reading groups develop their reading strategies.

Book introductions are an important tool to help guided reading groups practice and develop their reading strategies. When presenting a new book to the group, teachers can present a preview of the book, pointing out new vocabulary and drawing attention to the pictures. Today’s blog focuses on the importance of book introductions. In later blogs, I will share examples of book introductions for three books at three levels of difficulty.

WHY ARE BOOK INTRODUCTIONS IMPORTANT FOR GUIDED READING GROUPS?

The following reasons for the use of book introductions come from my Reading Recovery training and from my experiences in working with Reading Recovery students and tutoring children the past fifteen years:

A good book introduction helps children comprehend and become more fluent in the reading of the text. The readers need to know what the book is about. Setting a purpose for reading is important.

  • With an introduction, the teacher can scaffold and strengthen strategies used by successful readers.
  • Research tells us that young readers profit from talking about strategies they are beginning to use. Why is the strategy successful? What do they do as they use the strategy? When do they use it? Your introduction will serve as a model for their use.
  • The book introduction makes the first reading more successful and prevents the feeling that reading is difficult. This understanding can become the motivation for students to read more.
  • The teacher can introduce new language and encourage strategy usage when students come to an unknown word. (Multiple meaning words, names of characters, and/or verb tenses not used by students in oral language, etc.)
  • Young students cannot introduce a new book independently to others before they read. Your modeling can help them develop this skill as they grow as readers.
  • The book introduction is an opportunity for the teacher to support students at their "cutting edge" and to provide readiness for entry to higher level strategies.

 

story_children_000015576714_kali9.jpgSELECTION OF THE NEW BOOK

The first important guideline is to determine the common independent reading level of the guided reading group. Observing the children reading, running records, and recognizing oral language patterns that the children use can help you select a book that everyone will be able to read independently with 90 - 94 percent accuracy.

Explore two or three possible books at the level you feel is correct to use. Select some books that you think your students will enjoy and that they have strategies to use as they meet some new words.

Spend some time reading the books you have identified as appropriate for the group. Make sure you understand what is happening in the book, what new language is presented in the book and the presence of new sight words that will require decoding strategies. Think about the role of the pictures in the book and how they can be used to plant language and determine meaning. What strategies do you see your students using already that you do not need to include in your introduction?

Remember that placement in a guided reading group does not have to be a permanent placement. Some students will progress in their independent reading level and can move to another group. A running record can help you make the right decision about placement. Also consider rate and fluency as you make the decision.

 

ADVICE WHEN INTRODUCING A BOOK

Here are some tips for you to follow in order to effectively introduce a new book:

  • Be excited about the book as you introduce it. If the students desire to read the book, they can demonstrate the use of strategies and good fluency.
  • Be sure each child has a copy of the book to use during the introduction.
  • Provide just enough help. Expect students to use some of their developing strategies and those they are using independently.
  • Don't make you introduction too long. There needs to be enough time for the first reading and the use of new information given in the introduction.

Next week, I will share more ideas about effective book introductions for guided reading books. Make sure to check back to this blog for updates!

~~~

Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from our Kaleidoscope Collection. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children. 

~~~

Click the image below to download an information sheet with key features about the Kaleidoscope Collection, which contains books written by Geraldine Haggard.

Kaleidoscope Collection Info Sheet

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Topics: Leveled Readers, Geraldine Haggard, Guided Reading, Book Introductions

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