Hameray Classroom Literacy Blog!

The Role of Big Books and Shared Reading, Part 3

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Dec 20, 2016 3:03:00 PM

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This is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. To read the first article in this blog series about shared reading, click here. To read the second article, click here.

In the third and last post of this blog series, I will offer ways to use Joy Cowley big books for shared reading activities in your classroom.

BOOK THREE: WISHY-WASHY MOUSE

REASONS FOR SHARED READING:

  • Many students are familiar with Mrs. Wishy- Washy and her animals.
  • The book uses words ending in '-y' that are pronounced with the 'e' sound.
  • The book provides opportunities for inferential questions: why didn’t the animals help Mrs. Wishy-Washy get the mouse out of the barn?
  • The last page of the book uses quotation marks.
  • The word "help” appears as an uppercase "H" on page 3 and a lowercase "h" on pages 4 and 5.
  • The sight words 'is,’ 'in,’ 'the,’ 'did,’ 'not,’ 'said,' 'come,’ and 'out' are featured in the story.
  • The illustrations help the children understand character traits and feelings, helping to promote fluency.
  • The children can hear how the reader's voice changes with periods, quotation marks, and exclamation marks.

SUGGESTIONS FOR FIRST READING:

  • Introduce the book title and provide opportunities for children share what they know about Mrs. Wishy-Washy. Use the title page to introduce the mouse. What do you know about mice? Where do you think the mouse is? Why do you think that?
  • Read the story to the children, employing emotion as you read. As you come to multisyllabic words, tap the pointer to indicate the number of syllables.
  • After reading the story, ask the children to discuss how Mrs. Wishy-Washy and the animals felt about the mouse. Why did Mrs. Wishy-Washy ask for help? Why did the duck tell the mouse to come out 'now'? Why did Mrs. Wishy-Washy run back to the house?
  • Discuss the dialogue on page 8. How do we know that duck said this? Ask the children how the duck was feeling. Stress the word 'now.' Why is that word important?

SUGGESTIONS FOR SECOND READING:

  • Encourage the children to read along with you. What do the children think the word 'cried' means? Is it different from being 'sad'? When you get to page 8, invite a child to be the duck and the rest of the class to read the last line on that page.
  • Study the picture on the title page and the picture on page 2. What happened to the mouse between the two pages? When do you think Mrs. Wishy-Washy first saw the mouse?
  • Ask the children to study the faces of the animals on the last page. How do the animals feel about what happened? What might they be thinking?
  • Ask different children to use the pointer. If the child has trouble with 'one to one,' guide the student's hand, slowly reading and tapping out syllables in words with more than one syllable.

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FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES:

  • Create a blank bingo-shaped grid with a free center square. Prepare large flashcards with eight sight words or write each word on the board. Ask the children to write each word in one of the squares on their grid. Explain that everyone has created his or her own game boards. Call each word one time, encouraging students to listen for sounds in the word. After the students have put an 'x' on the word they think is correct, ask them to spell and say the word with you. If they were correct they can draw a smiley face inside the box. Two of the words begin alike but have different endings. The other six all begin with different sounds. Collect the students’ game boards to help you evaluate each child’s sight-reading strengths. Were they able to accurately write the words? Are there letters that they are still reversing?
  • Ask the children to draw a picture about a time when they were scared. Add a speech bubble above their heads and write a line of dialogue. Add a caption to explain what is happening in the picture.

FURTHER REREADING:

  • Use the book in oral or silent guided reading. The book can then go home for sharing with the family.
  • Add more Mrs. Wishy-Washy books into your class library.
  • Place the big book in a center or the class library. Students can take turns playing the role of the teacher.

 

BOOK FOUR: DAN AND THE PARROT

REASONS FOR SHARED READING:

  • The story includes dialogue that will help practice fluency and reinforce quotation marks and exclamation marks.
  • Rhyming patterns '-an,' '-ash,’ '-ay,’ and '-age' are included. Page 4 and 12 contain words that rhyme but have different spellings.
  • The text includes the contractions 'don't,' 'can't,' 'I'm,' 'you're,’ and 'I'll.’
  • Examples of onomatopoeia are on pages 8, 11, and 13.
  • The story allows for inference questions: What did the parrot mean when it called itself 'tricky'? Why did the parrot tell Dan that he was ' as slow as a flying carrot' on page 9?
  • Some words contain all capital letters. How are these words different?
  • Two synonyms for 'yelled' are used in the story: cried and shrieked. Why did the author use different words?
  • Words ending in '-ing,' '-ed,’ and ‘-y' are used more than once in the story. Discuss the purpose of these particles.
  • The pictures provide good clues for unknown words and understanding character traits.

SUGGESTIONS FOR FIRST READING:

  • If students are already familiar with Dan the Flying Man, ask them to share what they know about Dan.
  • Introduce the three characters on front cover. Ask the children to predict some things that might happen in the story. Turn to the title page. What does the picture tell us?
  • Use a pointer as your read with expression and emotion. Exaggerate the quotation marks and exclamation points.
  • Discuss the main conflict and Dan’s resolution. Why did Gran call Dan "a clever man”?
  • Discuss ways that the Dan and the parrot are alike and different. Use pictures from the books for hints (setting, size, method of flying, etc.) Create a T-chart to record the children's comparisons.

SUGGESTIONS FOR SECOND READING:

  • Encourage students to read along with you and adopt the different character’s voices. Point out the exclamation mark on page 1 and reaffirm its purpose. Practice as a class.
  • Read the story, using a pointer and talking like the characters.

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FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES:

  • Assign each child to a character in the book. Students without an assigned character can 'SWOOP’ and ‘FLIP-FLAP.' The picture on each page will give clues about which character is speaking. You can point to the character to help the children understand when they should speak.
  • Provide a list of the contractions in the book and ask the students to write the two words that formed the contraction. Then write a sentence using the contraction.
  • The simile "slow as a carrot' was used in the story. Discuss the definition of a simile. The following simile patterns can be included on an activity sheet with blank spaces for the children to complete the simile:
    • The parrot's wings could flap as fast as ________ __________.
    • Dan could fly as high as ________ ____________________!
    • Dan swooped into the air like ________ _______________.
    • As the story ended, the parrot was as mad as ________ ________.
  • Explore the following word meanings, using pictures as clues:
    • "That's not fair!"
    • "I don't care!"
    • shriek with rage"
  • Ask students to study the picture on the final page. What is probably going to happen again?

FURTHER REREADING:

  • Place the book in a center where children can read the story and assume the role of teacher. The book can also be used with a shared reading group or shared with families.
  • Add the other Dan the Flying Man books to the classroom library.

I hope that this blog series has helped you understand the power of shared reading and that you will enjoy it as much as I have over the years. Not only is it a delightful way to spend time with all students, but it also provides ample opportunity for follow-up activities based on your students’ needs.

 

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Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from Hameray's Kaleidoscope Collection. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children. 

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Visit our website to learn more about Wishy-Washy Mouse, Dan and the Parrot, and other books by Joy Cowley. Click the image below to download a brochure featuring Hameray's Big Books Collection!

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Topics: Joy Cowley Early Birds, Big Books, Shared Reading, Geraldine Haggard, Guided Reading

The Role of Big Books and Shared Reading, Part 2

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Dec 13, 2016 3:03:00 PM

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This is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. To read the first article in this blog series about shared reading, click here

In the second post of this blog series, I will introduce two Hameray books that are excellent choices for shared reading.

BOOK ONE: HALLOWEEN NIGHT

REASONS FOR SHARED READING:

*Topic is of special interest to children of all ages.

*The story utilizes a repetitive sentence pattern. ("I saw a ________looking at me.")

*Page six repeats the names of the things the boy saw. Beginning letter sounds can be used as clues.

*The introductory phrase "On Halloween night" can be used to discuss breathing at comma, while the exclamation mark on page 7 allows for reading with excitement. There are quotation marks around "BOO."

*Multisyllabic words such as 'Halloween,’ 'vampire,’ 'mummy,’ 'shouted,’ 'away,’ and 'jack-o-lantern' are included.

*Sight words such as ‘a,’ ‘at,’ ‘rat,’ and ‘on’ offer multiple opportunities for the students to see and read the words.

SUGGESTIONS FOR FIRST READING:

  • Introduce the title and ask children when and where they think the story is taking place. Invite them to talk about the picture on the front cover. Quickly visit each page and asks children if they can identify objects in the pictures. Remind them that they may know the beginning sounds of these words.
  • Read the story to the children without inviting them to read with you. Read with great excitement and feeling. Tap the pointer for multi-syllable words.
  • Ask the children to predict why the characters all ran away on page 8. How does the picture help?
  • Ask the children to discuss things that might happen next in the story.kaleidoscope-collection-halloween-night-2-1.jpg

SUGGESTIONS FOR SECOND READING:

  • As you revisit the story, invite the children to read along with you. Continue to use the pointer and read slowly enough that the children can read along with you with fluency and emotion. Children might frame sight words.
  • Reread sentences with multisyllabic words and clap out each syllable.
  • Display the following story map on the screen or board. Have the children complete the sentences:
    • On Halloween night, I saw a ______________.
    • On Halloween night I saw a _______________.
    • On Halloween night, I saw a _______________.
    • On Halloween night, I saw a _______________, a ________________, and a ____________.
    • They all ___________. (Accept various responses.)
  • Have each student write his or her own story, using the shared writing exercise as a guide. After illustrating, children can sit in groups of two or three and share their stories. Remind them that their pictures provide clues for their stories.

FURTHER REREREADING:

  • Use guided reading copies and/or big books in the class library. Allow students to read in small groups with one child assuming the role of the teacher. The shared writing could be displayed on the board as a center and the children read as a group with one child using a pointer.

 

BOOK TWO: MUD SOUP

REASONS FOR SHARED READING:

  • Pages 2−6 of the book are based on a simple sentence pattern.
  • Page 7 contains a word that is repeated three times. The picture serves as a great clue for reading 'stir.’
  • Sight words "went' and 'the' are repeated on several pages.
  • Periods and exclamation marks allow for reading with fluency and emotion.
  • The phrase "In went the _______" is repeated five times.
  • Young children enjoy playing with water and dirt!

SUGGESTIONS FOR FIRST READING:

  • Share the front cover of the big book. Ask the children to name the items they see and suggest what they think the boy may do. Point to the words in the title and read the words.
  • Turn to the inside title page and reread the name of the book. Explain that the author took pictures to illustrate her book. Study the picture on the title page. What is the boy doing?
  • Go to page 2 and read the story to the children using a pointer. Read with expression and breathe in the proper places.
  • Revisit pages 2-6 and ask a child to frame the words 'dirt,' 'water,' ‘sticks,’ 'leaves,’ and 'stones.’ After each word is framed, ask the child to frame the beginning sound and share the name of the first letter in the words. Explain that these letters can help them read the words, but the pictures can also give them clues to recognizing the word. 
  • What letter is at the end of the word ‘in’? Do you hear that 'n' as they say the word? You can similarly model the upper and lower case "i." Remind the children that the first word in a sentence always begins with a capital letter.

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SUGGESTIONS FOR SECOND READING:

  • Invite the children to read with you. Use a pointer as you read and read slowly enough that they can read with you. Pause at periods and exclamation marks and discuss their purposes. How is the exclamation mark read differently from the period?
  • Students should recognize some capital letters. Page 6 includes both upper and lower case 'w.'
  • Discuss the plural forms on pages 4, 5, and 6. How does adding 's' to these words change the meanings of the words?
  • As a shared writing activity, write a how-to for making FRUIT SALAD or VEGETABLE SOUP. First decide what contained to use instead of the bucket. Invite a child to write a sight word or beginning sounds for names of ingredients. The completed writing should remain posted so children can see their work. The children can then draw the ingredients they would want in their soup or salad and label each picture.

FURTHER REREADING:

  • A guided reading copy could be taken home for reading and sharing with family.
  • The book could be reread in a guided group session for those who are ready to read the book.
  • Add the big book to a center or the class library. Students can take turns using the pointer and framing words.

In my next post, I will introduce two more Hameray books with suggestions for shared reading activities.

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Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from Hameray's Kaleidoscope Collection. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children. 

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Visit our website to learn more about Halloween Night and Mud Soup. Click the image below to download a brochure featuring Hameray's Big Books Collection!

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Topics: Big Books, Shared Reading, Geraldine Haggard, Guided Reading

The Role of Big Books and Shared Reading

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Nov 8, 2016 3:49:00 PM

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This is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. 

As the first article in a new series, this blog post is designed to share the history and purpose of big books. In subsequent posts, I will share suggestions for the use of three Hameray big books.

HISTORY FOR THE ENDORSEMENT OF USING BIG BOOKS

Don Holdaway refers to big books as “shared-book experiences” in his book The Foundations of Literacy (1979). He discussed students who are not fortunate enough to experience bedtime stories. These children neither possess the early oral language skills of their peers before entering school nor the warm personal experience with an adult who shared the excitement of reading. Holdaway found that when all the students could see the text in a shared reading book, they understand the role of print in reading.

Once, I attended a trip led by Don Holdaway and visited New Zealand schools. I watched Don and teachers in New Zealand use of published big books and class-made big books. I saw children excitedly reading big books together after the books had been used with the entire class. The classes in New Zealand had children of different ages grouped together, so guided reading was a part of the many collective reading activities in the classroom. 

child reading books_14715389_Otnaydur.jpgATTRIBUTES OF SHARED READING

A teacher must choose a big book that the students will want to read and reread. The book should contain repeated phrases and sentences, rhyming words, and pictures that support the text. Such a book will strengthen the oral language skills of the students in a non-threatening way. 

In Different Paths to Common Outcomes (1998), Marie Clay recommends that the teacher move from whole to parts of words, emphasizing the semantic and syntactic cues.

The first reading is done by the teacher after an introduction to the book. The children are not invited to read along but may use any prior knowledge to talk about the book’s content. Thirty minutes is sufficient for the teacher to model, discuss, and guide students.

     Later readings allow students to read along with the teacher in big groups, small groups, and independently.

 

 

 

 

REASONS FOR SHARED READING EXPERIENCES

  • Shared reading provides an opportunity for the entire class to participate, allowing everyone to feel successful and be a part of a happy experience with a book.
  • Children who fear that reading is difficult can have a sense of individual achievement.
  • The teacher can introduce new strategies, provide opportunities for practice, and help students truly understand the importance of the strategies.
  • Discussion allows students to use prior knowledge that will provide a foundation for strong reading comprehension skills.
  • The details of letters and words can be discussed and used later in writing.
  • Students become familiar with essential sight words.
  • The teacher can model the cross-checking strategy that is essential to good reading, teaching students the semantics and syntax behind questions: "Did that make sense? Did that sound right?" Clay believes that meaning and syntax came before print details.
  • Fluent reading by the teacher and emphasis of punctuation can help students use punctuation marks as they read text with emotion and meaning.
  • Research shares that multiple readings of a text are important. Shared reading big books can be a part of the class library, while smaller copies of the book can become home reading.

In New Zealand, I saw small groups of children revisiting and reading texts from shared reading. One student even assumed the role of the teacher!

In my next post, I will present example lessons from the Hameray Big Book Collection. Subscribe in the right-hand sidebar to receive my next post in your mailbox.

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Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from Hameray's Kaleidoscope Collection. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children. 

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Click the image below to download a brochure featuring Hameray's Big Books Collection!

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Topics: Big Books, Shared Reading, Geraldine Haggard, Guided Reading

Why Are Big Books So Special?

Posted by Sally Hosokawa on Aug 25, 2016 3:42:00 PM

 

Both teachers and students love Hameray’s Big Books collection, which feature select titles from the Joy Cowley Collection, My World Series, and Fables Real World Series. We’re excited to be releasing 30 more Big Books in September from the Joy Cowley Early BirdsColleción Joy Cowley and Kaleidoscope Collection—keep an eye out for our new catalog coming soon! 

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What makes these books so special? First and foremost, the large book size immediately commands the attention of any reader. In order for students to understand the importance and the joy of reading, you need to make sure that books are literally a big part of their lives!

MWBB_covers-MC-300.jpgThe enlarged text and illustrations also ensure that every student can visually access the book. You could try using a document camera to project the book during a read aloud, but not all schools offer this technology, and there’s always the risk of technological failures wrecking havoc on your lesson plan. When you use a standard-sized book for a read aloud, though, some students in the back of the reading circle grumble or shove other students in order to see. Other students will simply stop paying attention because it is too difficult to follow along from a distance. With a Big Book, you can prevent class conflict and keep all your students engaged!

Apart from the story itself, every young child’s favorite part of the reading experience is flipping the pages. Even reluctant readers will be itching to get a turn at flipping the large and satisfying pages of the Big Book, resulting in a more positive attitude towards reading time.

 

A Big Book also works wonders outside of read aloud time. During sustained silent reading, many students like to look through books already read aloud by the teacher. Rereading is also an essential tool for developing reading fluency (CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.1.4). Because of the popularity of the book, however, arguments may break out over who can read the book first.

Fables-Dove-250.jpgHameray offers combo sets with a Big Book and matching readers, but your limited classroom library size might prevent you from purchasing matching readers for every book you read aloud. Standard picture books are only large enough for 1-2 children to read at a time, so other students might lose enthusiasm if they have to wait their turn or read another book that doesn’t pique their interest. The Big Book solves this problem entirely—its size is large enough that four students can easily share the book at the same time!

 


By now, it should be self-evident that Big Books are a must-buy for every classroom. Check out all our available Big Book products here at our website or downlaod the brochure below!

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Click the image below to download a brochure containing Hameray's narrative and informational Big Books. Keep an eye out for the upcoming Fall 2016 catalog, which will feature 30 new Big Book titles!

                                                                Leveled Big Books

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Topics: Joy Cowley Collection, Leveled Readers, Big Books, Sally Hosokawa

Shared Reading and Community Helpers—with FREE Download!

Posted by Sharon Dudley on Jul 5, 2016 9:12:26 PM

Sharon_Butterfly_1.jpgSharon Dudley is a veteran educator with over 20 years of experience in the early childhood field. She uses technology to create games and personalized take-home reading books for each child based on their needs and interests. She offers nearly 200 games, books, and other resources on Teachers Pay Teachers. She is also the author of a blog, Teaching With Sight.


Community Helpers and More!

My ESOL kindergarten students loved reading the big book My Community that is part of the My World series. Every page prompted rich discussions about our neighborhoods. In the beginning of the year, my students were very mixed up about communities, community helpers, and vehicles they use. For example, I asked “Who puts out fires?” and one student responded “A fire engine!” He could not tell me that it was a fire fighter who actually did the job, and that the fire engine was the vehicle.

Now my students have a much better grasp of the theme vocabulary. One thing I like about this book is that the illustrations show many different types of communities, encouraging the children to contrast city life (where they live) to a country community. Another thing I like is that the book talks about various homes as well as places we go in the community to have fun (such as pools), which the students were very excited to see. I don’t often see this in books about communities.

MWBB_MyCommunity.jpgMusic is a very powerful tool to help children remember facts. When I was little, I learned my multiplication tables and parts of speech from listening to and watching “School House Rock.”

Therefore, I incorporate music into all subjects of the curriculum, including social studies. One simple idea for centers that I’ve used this year is placing a CD in Listening Center that has community helper songs such as:

  • “Community Workers” by Bubbly Vee
  • “Community Helpers” by Mar Harmon
  • “Community Helpers” by Shawn Brown

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In Creativity Center, I have Duplos that students can use to make a whole community with buildings, people, and vehicles. I encourage my students to talk about their work as they build it, since I am blind and I want to know what they’re doing. This strategy works great for sighted teachers too. You can record their narrations with your phone or other device to document their growth throughout the year.

In ABC Center, I place cards in a pocket chart so that students can use a pointer to read sentences independently. I go over it first in large group, and students usually pick up on it fairly quickly. One of the products I offer in my Teachers Pay Teachers shop is a Community Helper Folder that helps children make their own books and labeled pictures about their favorite community helpers. I made a freebie that you can download at the bottom of this page. It includes a community helpers matching game and pocket chart sentences.

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Sharon Dudley is a classroom teacher and grade-level chairperson at the kindergarten level at a Title I school in Prince George’s County, MD with a 95% ESOL population. She was featured in a TV news segment for being a blind educator who achieved certification from the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards in just one year, and she has served as a mentor for candidates who are aiming to achieve certification themselves.

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For more information on the My World series, which contains the book used in this post, you can click here to visit our website, or click the image below to download a series information sheet. For the community helpers matching activity and pocket chart sentences, click the image to the right below to download!

New Call-to-Action   Community Helper Matching and Pocket Chart

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Topics: Informational Text, Big Books, Community Helpers, Sharon Dudley

Mrs. Wishy-Washy and the Importance of Dramatic Play

Posted by Kathy Crane on Sep 29, 2015 3:30:00 PM

This is a guest post by Kathy Crane, one of our occasional guest bloggers. If you like what you see here, check back frequently for more posts from her and click here to read her blog.

Times have changed since I first used Mrs. Wishy-Washy in my kindergarten classroom in 1991. The demands of the kindergarten teacher have moved into the world of academia, and kindergarten has become the new first grade.

With this great push of academics, there has been a tendency for early childhood educators to deliver academic content using teaching methods that are only appropriate for older learners and ignoring proven early childhood practices.

One such practice is that of dramatic play. I am saddened at the lack of dramatic play opportunities that are being provided young learners. When I asked a teacher why she didn't include it, she said, "With curriculum demands I simply don't have time for it." While I can see her concern, I maintain that I don't have time to leave out dramatic play!

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Play has so many benefits for young children and it is becoming the lost art of childhood. I can't imagine my program without it! So, flash forward 24 years! I am still using Mrs. Wishy-Washy in the classroom. Perhaps with more sophisticated knowledge and strategic purpose, but kids love it just the same!

You will find that bringing dramatic play into your classroom will build students' comprehension and fluency skills, deepen understanding of story elements, and provide Just Plain Fun. Acting out quality big books such as those written by Joy Cowley are timeless!

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Kathy Crane holds a M.Ed. in Curriculum & Instruction: Reading, is a published author of thirteen books, a freelance author and developer of teaching curriculum, has been a teacher of kindergarten for twenty-two years, and publishes the blog Kindergarten Kiosk

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For additional information on Mrs. Wishy-Washy books, click here to visit our website, or click the images below to download series highlights sheets with key features. 

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Topics: Mrs. Wishy-Washy, Kindergarten, Big Books, Kathy Crane

Hameray Herald: January 2015 Issue

Posted by Tara Rodriquez on Jan 15, 2015 11:15:00 AM

 

Hameray Herald: January 2015 Issue

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Joy Cowley Is Coming to America!

Find Out Where You Can Spot Her!

The beloved author of the Mrs. Wishy-Washy series is coming back to the United States to celebrate the 30th Anniversary of Reading Recovery in North America! Joy will be a keynote speaker at the National Reading Recovery & K–6 Literacy Conference taking place in Columbus, Ohio during February 7–10, 2015. Also, she will be spending some time at the Hameray booth, so make sure to stop by and meet Joy if you are attending the conference.

Shared Reading? Try These!

New in our My World collection of informational texts: five big books, each introducing one of the five themes in My World! These big books (12” wide by 16” tall) are perfect for shared reading and for exposing even the youngest children to informational text features and fascinating facts about the world around them. Guided reading levels for this series ranges from A–F.

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Joy Cowley's newest children's book, What Is a Book?, written specially to honor the 30th Anniversary of Reading Recovery in North America, will be launched at the National Conference. 

While all conference attendees will receive a special hardcover collector's edition, a limited number will also be available to Hameray customers. Click HERE to be added to our waiting list.

 

Tarantulas, Coyotes, and Sharks! Oh, My!

If you liked Set 1 of the beautifully photographed Zoozoo Animal World series, you're going to love Set 2!  These fun informational texts are designed to inform students about twenty animals in four   different habitats: Desert, GrasslandsMountain, and Ocean. . Guided reading levels for this series range from C–F. 

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Check out our literacy blog, which offers useful content, free downloads, and all the resources you need to make teaching a little easier. Some of the recent blog topics include:

- Guided Reading Group Activities
- Shared Reading
- Supplementing Textbooks with Leveled Readers

Upcoming Conferences

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 Hameray will be attending the following conferences:

We hope you will come by to visit with us!

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Topics: Joy Cowley, Hameray Herald, Conference, Big Books, Shared Reading, My World, Reading Recovery

Dine with Joy Cowley! Enter to Win!

Posted by Tara Rodriquez on Nov 20, 2014 8:00:00 AM

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Win a trip to dine with the beloved author of the Mrs. Wishy-Washy books. Joy Cowley will be a keynote speaker at Reading 
Recovery's 30th Anniversary Celebration (Feb 7–10 in Columbus, OH). The trip includes:

WhatBook_PLC_cover-300• Dinner with Joy Cowley
• Entry to the RRCNA Exhibitor’s Hall
• Round-trip airfare to Columbus, OH
• Two nights’ hotel stay
• Signed copy of Joy’s new collector’s edition book, What Is a Book?, written specially for the Reading Recovery 30th Anniversary

Hameray Publishing Group is a staunch supporter of Reading Recovery and is thrilled to participate in its 30th anniversary celebration. Hameray offers a two collections of Joy’s titles: Joy Cowley Early Birds and the Joy Cowley Collection, including big books. 

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Topics: Joy Cowley Collection, Mrs. Wishy-Washy, Joy Cowley, Joy Cowley Early Birds, Big Books, Giveaway, Reading Recovery

Shared Reading with Little Dan—with FREE download!

Posted by Elizabeth Hall on Nov 18, 2014 8:00:00 AM

Hall-10-1-200This is a guest post by blogger Elizabeth Hall. If you like what you see here, you can check out her blog, Kickin' It in Kindergarten, for more of her writing, or you can click here to see her other contributions to our blog!

I love reading books where the students are able to get more schema about the character they have already met. I always have a book that we use for Shared Reading. The week we read Little Dan was the same week we were reading Dan, The Flying Man. Students were able to learn more about this character through reading Little Dan.

This story is about Dan when he was a little boy. The kids were so interested to learn that he got his flying hat and clothes from his grandpa. They were able to see his house and make connections to him as a child as opposed to just being Dan, the Flying Man. Each year, my students always love reading this book. I feel like they have gotten to understand the character better by seeing him through the two different stories.

After we read Little Dan, we brainstormed the different problems that Dan had when he was little. He wanted to fly ever since he was a baby but he kept falling. His Mom and his Dad would help him when we got hurt, but it was his grandpa in the end that solved his problem of wanting to fly. There are great connections that students can make throughout this story. There is a birthday party, parents helping their child, and receiving a present. Most students can make connections with the character. This is also another way to deepen a child’s understanding and retention of the story.

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We focused on writing about his two problems and how his grandpa helped him overcome his problem. I had the students draw and write (we are focusing on writing) about the two problems in the story. Then, they had to do the same for the solution. This is a great graphic organizer to use with any story. Encourage students to write and make connections about what they read. You can download a Dan-themed graphic organizer below.

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elizabeth hallThis is my sixth year as a kindergarten teacher. The best part of kindergarten is watching a child fall in love with reading. It has become my passion to show children the possibilities and amazing adventures literature can offer. I love watching their eyes light up when they tell me they can read their favorite book, or they can’t wait to go back to the library! I have the best job in the world! I am so lucky to have such a wonderful support system in and out of school. My family lives close and I get to spend a lot of time with them! While I am not at school, I enjoy running, teaching spin class, swimming, playing kickball, spending time with my husband, and traveling. I also have a sheltie named Maggie, which is spoiled rotten. I am married to the best guy in the world, work with wonderful people, and have fabulous students!

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We've got plenty of big books for shared reading! Click here to see them on our website! If you want to know more about the Joy Cowley Collection, which features the Dan stories, click the image below to download an information sheet with series highlights! Click the image to the right to download the graphic organizer sheet

 

 New Call-to-Action  Little Dan Graphic Organizer

 
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Topics: Joy Cowley, K-2 Literacy, Kindergarten, Elizabeth Hall, Big Books, Shared Reading

Shared Reading with The Meanies

Posted by Elizabeth Hall on Oct 14, 2014 8:00:00 AM

elizabeth hallThis is a guest post by blogger Elizabeth Hall. If you like what you see here, you can check out her blog, Kickin' It in Kindergarten, for more of her writing, or you can click here to see her other contributions to our blog!

One way that I love bringing reading and characters alive in my classroom is through shared reading. My favorite books are those featuring Mrs. Wishy-Washy, The Meanies, and The Hungry Giant by Joy Cowley. I read the same text from Monday to Friday with the goal of students being able to read the words independently by Friday. We do activities to accompany the book throughout the week.

When I saw Meanies’ Night Out, I knew that we had to have it in our classroom! Every year without fail, the Meanies in the story are always a favorite. They think they are funny for sleeping in garbage cans and eating old bubble gum. Any time you can get kids laughing, it is a good thing! They find an emotional connection to the story and they get excited when they see the characters in a different story.

One of the activities that we did this time around was about what it meant to be “Nice-ies”. They all knew what Meanies did, but it was a great activity to piggy-back off of both Meanies stories. I never miss an opportunity to talk character education. First, we brainstormed what things Meanies do from both the original Meanies story and then also from Meanies’ Night Out.

We talked about having manners and treating others kindly. Then, I asked students what the opposite of a Meanie would be. I let them come up with a few ideas until I prompted them to think about what Nice-ies would look like. Then, they started to talk about the pretend characters and brainstorm some different actions that Nice-ies would do.

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Students in kindergarten are just learning how to sound out words and phonetic spelling is vital in the development of young readers and writers. I asked students to sound out one action verb to finish the sentence “Nice-ies…” and they responded: help, hug, are nice, make friends, and be kind. This was one of our first independent writing activities and I was so pleased with how they turned out!

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This is my sixth year as a kindergarten teacher. The best part of kindergarten is watching a child fall in love with reading. It has become my passion to show children the possibilities and amazing adventures literature can offer. I love watching their eyes light up when they tell me they can read their favorite book, or they can’t wait to go back to the library! I have the best job in the world! I am so lucky to have such a wonderful support system in and out of school. My family lives close and I get to spend a lot of time with them! While I am not at school, I enjoy running, teaching spin class, swimming, playing kickball, spending time with my husband, and traveling. I also have a sheltie named Maggie, which is spoiled rotten. I am married to the best guy in the world, work with wonderful people, and have fabulous students!

  ~~~

We've got plenty of big books for shared reading! Click here to see them on our website! If you want to know more about the Joy Cowley Collection, which features the Meanies stories, click the image below to download an information sheet with series highlights!

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Topics: Joy Cowley, K-2 Literacy, Kindergarten, Elizabeth Hall, Big Books, Shared Reading

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