Hameray Classroom Literacy Blog!

Using Leveled Books to Help Students Develop Positive Behavioral Skills, Part 4

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Jul 21, 2016 3:30:00 PM

GHaggardbiopic

This is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. It is the fourth and last in a series about using leveled books to teach the importance of good citizenship and classroom behavior. Click here to read the first post, second post, and third post.

In this series of blog posts, I have been looking at the use of guided-reading-leveled books in the early grades to help young students develop positive behavioral skills. Today, I will conclude the series by looking at No Rules from the Kaleidoscope Collection. By reading Friends Are Fun, At School, A Bad Day, and No Rules, your students can become good citizens at school while developing their literacy skills at the same time.

Book Four: NO RULES

Remind the children that for several days, they have been discussing ways that good friendship leads to good school experiences. Use the chart prepared at the last session that shares ways to prevent a bad day.

Display the cover of the book, No Rules. Introduce the grandmother and her granddaughter. Ask students for examples of things they do with a family member and why they enjoy the activities.

no_rules_400.jpg

Pages 25:

  • Were rules necessary for everyone to enjoy the activities in the story?
  • Do you think the grandmother and granddaughter in the story need rules? What might those rules be?
  • What is a rule?

Pages 68:

As they hear the story ending, students will understand why the grandmother felt the need for a rule. Provide an opportunity for them to offer comments about what they heard. Reread the last page to help the children compose a rule:

  • What rule do you think the grandmother thought was needed? 

 

The two in the story were at the grandmother's home. Remind the students that you previously asked them think about rules that are necessary at school. List these responses on the board or on a transparency. If the children need help responding, the following scenarios could be shared. After each, the children can suggest results of the scenario and a corresponding rule:

  • Janet sees her friend, Sue leave to go to the restroom. She decides to go and visit with Sue in the restroom.
  • William does not listen to the teacher when she explains an activity, so he does not know where to go and what to do.
  • Jane talked while the teacher read a story, so the teacher had to stop the story. During group activities, Jane also talks while other students are talking.
  • Jimmy's teacher takes out the supplies needed for an art activity. Jimmy does not want to share and grabs something from Joe's hand. Joe becomes angry, and the teacher has to talk to the two boys.

Ask the children to raise a hand if they understand the reasoning behind the rules. After recording and reading the rules from the children, explain that you want the children to follow these rules. Remind them that you will be watching and will be proud of those who follow the rules. They will be helping you and others enjoy the classroom.

On following days, recognize and praise individuals, groups of children, and the entire class when you see one of these rules being followed. At least once a week, read the rules with the students and remind them of the importance of each rule. Other rules can be added as the need for more guidance is seen in the classroom. Involve the students' wording of each new rule and ask them to think about why the rule it is needed. 

In summary, remember the importance of the classroom environment and your role in making the classroom a happy and safe place. Research tells us that students in well-managed classrooms have more friends, score in higher percentiles on achievement tests, and become caring and fruitful students as they progress through the school years.

This concludes my series of posts on using books to teach positive behavioral skills in young studnets. To go back to the first post in the series, click here. If you like what you've read here, you can see an archive of my earlier posts here! I contribute fairly frequently, so subscribe to the blog in the upper right sidebar to get my next series of posts delivered directly to your mailbox.

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Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from our Kaleidoscope Collection. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children. 

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Click the image below to download an information sheet with key features about the Kaleidoscope Collection, which contains the book mentioned in this post and books written by Geraldine Haggard.

Kaleidoscope Collection Info Sheet

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Topics: Leveled Readers, Reading Activities, Kaleidoscope Collection, Geraldine Haggard, Behavioral Skills

Using Leveled Books to Help Students Develop Positive Behavioral Skills, Part 3

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Jul 19, 2016 3:00:00 PM

GHaggardbiopic

This is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. It is the third in a series about using leveled books to teach the importance of good citizenship and classroom behavior. To read the first post, click here. To read the second post, click here.

In this series of blog posts, I have been looking at the use of guided-reading-leveled books in the early grades to help young students develop positive behavioral skills. Today’s example text is A Bad Day from the Kaleidoscope Collection. Although the book is leveled at Guided Reading Level F and designed as a read-aloud for kindergarten, some first graders may already be reading independently at the book's level.

Book Three: A BAD DAY

Remind the children that friends can turn play and school activities into happy experiences. Guide the children as they talk about the importance of friendship. Invite volunteers to share a happy time they have had in the classroom. Ask the others to share why they think their friend had that positive experience. Can all experiences be happy ones? If there was a bad day in the classroom recently, ask the children to discuss and explore why. Explain that you are going to share a story, A Bad Day

Pages 29:

Invite the children to share their own bad days:

  • Why did these bad things happen? Illustrations on pages 29 can be used to discuss why bad days may happen.
  • What could the boy have done to prevent the bad things?
  • Where was he when the bad things happened?

Pages 10–12:

  • What was the surprise ending to the story?
  • How do they think the boy felt when his bad days were actually dreams?
  • How did he feel when he thought the bad things really happened?

Select pages 2, 3, 4, and 8. How did the bad days in his dream affect others? Help the children understand that when one of them has a bad day, the day can become a bad day for others. Pages 2, 4, and 8 probably became bad days for his mother and his teacher. For example, the torn pants on page 2 meant that the teacher had to contact a parent to bring another pair of pants. If the school nurse carried extra clothing for emergencies, the boy would have needed the nurse’s time and help. The dream on page 3 would require the teacher to find lunch for him, while the food his mother had prepared for him would be wasted.
bad_day_400.jpg

Conclude by asking the children to share ways that they can help prevent bad days. Use the language experience technique to record the children's suggestions. The name of the child sharing an idea can be written in front of the idea. Have these children read their ideas to the class. The chart could be displayed on the bulletin board for children to read when they have library time. Inform the children that the next session on friendship at school will be based on classroom rules. Encourage them to think about important school rules and why those rules are needed.

In the next blog post, I will share the fourth and last leveled book that you can use to help young students develop positive behavioral skills, leading to more effective classroom management. 

 

This is the end of part three in this series of using leveled books to teach the importance of good citizenship and classroom behavior. Click here to read the next installment! You can also subscribe to our blog in the upper right sidebar to get new posts delivered to your inbox.

~~~

Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from our Kaleidoscope Collection. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children.

~~~

Click the image below to download an information sheet with key features about the Kaleidoscope Collection, which contains the book mentioned in this post and books written by Geraldine Haggard.

Kaleidoscope Collection Info Sheet 

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Topics: Leveled Readers, Reading Activities, Kaleidoscope Collection, Geraldine Haggard, Behavioral Skills

Using Leveled Books to Help Students Develop Positive Behavioral Skills, Part 2

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Jul 14, 2016 3:30:00 PM

GHaggardbiopic

This is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. It is the second in a series about using leveled books to teach the importance of good citizenship and classroom behavior. To read the first post, click here.

In this series of blog posts, I have been looking at the use of leveled books in the early grades to help young students develop positive behavioral skills. Today’s example text is At School, a part of the Oral Language Development Series that focuses on different language structures for young readers.

Book Two: AT SCHOOL

Use the Elmo to display the front cover of At School. The following questions can be used to guide the reading:

  • Where are the children on the cover?
  • What are they doing?
  • Do you think they are having fun?

There may be multiple answers to these questions. Invite the students who think the two children are having fun to explain their reasoning. Then, the students who think the opposite can share their thoughts. Discuss how this latter opinion can change as work tasks become easier and more familiar. Tell the children that you will be talking more about this topic during later discussions. Share the importance of being a good friend by not disturbing your friends as they work.

Hameray_At_School_LS1_Printer-1.gifDisplay the title page on the Elmo and ask the following questions:

  • Where is Danny?
  • Do you think he is having a good time?

Remind the children that they have a classroom library and also a library used by all children in the school:

  • How do good friends act in the library?
  • Why is this important?
  • What happens if one child is not a good friend in the library? (The boy would not be able to read and enjoy reading. The librarian might have to leave someone he or she was helping. The librarian’s storytime reading would be interrupted, etc.)

Pages 25:

The sentence structure in the book is "Danny likes ____." Pause as you come to the last word in each sentence. Ask the children what they can do to determine the word (beginning sound, photo context). Reread the sentence together, emphasizing the word 'likes:' 

  • Are there times when Danny participates in activities with other children? 
  • How are these times different?
  • Why should Danny be a good friend when he works with others?

Pages 67:

Ask the students to share acts of friendship that they have seen in the lunchroom and on the playground:

  • Is Danny still in the classroom?
  • Is it still important for him to be a good friend on the playground and the lunchroom?
  • How is being a good friend in these two places like being a good friend in the classroom?
  • What might happen on the playground and in the lunchroom if he was not a good friend?

Page 8:

Conclude the session by sharing the last page on the Elmo. Remind the children that they have discussed the importance of friendship throughout the school:

  • Which of the photos in the first four do you like best? Ask the children to raise their hands when you share the four: reading, writing, math, and music.
The results of this activity may help you see how the children feel about these four activities. Alternatively, ask the children to draw a picture of they like about school and label it "_______ likes _____." These drawings can be compiled into a book format and placed in the class library.

This is the end of part two in this series of using leveled books to teach the importance of good citizenship and classroom behavior. Click here to read the next installment. You can subscribe to our blog in the upper right sidebar to get new posts delivered to your inbox.

~~~

Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from our Kaleidoscope Collection. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children.

~~~

Click the left image below to download an information sheet with key features about the Oral Language Development Series, which contains the book mentioned in this post. Click the right image below to download an information sheet with key features about the Kaleidoscope Collection, which includes books that Geraldine Haggard has authored.

Oral Language Development Series Info Sheet                    Kaleidoscope Collection Info Sheet

 

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Topics: Reading Activities, Oral Language Development, Geraldine Haggard, Behavioral Skills

Using Leveled Books to Help Students Develop Positive Behavioral Skills, Part 1

Posted by Geraldine Haggard on Jul 12, 2016 3:30:00 PM

GHaggardbiopic

This is a guest blog post by Dr. Geraldine Haggard, who is a retired teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader, author, and university teacher. It is the first in a series about using leveled books to teach the importance of good citizenship and classroom behavior.

In Classroom Management that Works, Marzano, Marzano, and Pickering reveal the critical role of managing appropriate behavior in the classroom. The authors share the following research findings:

  • The teacher is the key to effective student achievement.
  • Effective teachers must be effective with students of all achievement levels.
  • All students profit from guidance in proper participation in activities inside and outside the classroom.

"Helping Children Learn Positive Friendship Skills," an article published by Kids Matter, identifies friendship patterns for the primary grades, skills needed by various age groups, and skills that promote friendship.

Friendship skills include sharing conversations, taking turns, expressing feelings, complimenting others, accepting others, refusing to join others in negative behaviors, sharing, asking what one wants and needs, apologizing to others, following rules, being a good loser, helping others, and cooperating. A teacher can immediately recognize these as the traits of a successful student who helps other students be successful.

These friendship skills must be explicitly taught. Three ways that you can support children's friendship skills are the following:

  • Teach positive social skills.
  • Be a coach (prompt, remind, encourage).
  • Help children solve friendship conflicts.

As a teacher, I found that helping children learn how to work and play together was necessary if I wanted to create an effective classroom environment. Using the book Friends Are Fun for two introductory classroom sessions, you can facilitate a fruitful new year with a new group of students. You will also be teaching curriculum goals, as shared in the state and national language arts standards.

MyWorld_FriendsAreFun.jpg

Book One, Session One: FRIENDS ARE FUN

  • Guide a discussion based on what the children feel is the meaning of 'friend.' As the discussion comes to a close, ask the children to complete the following sentence: "A friend is ___." There may be more than one definition. Reread the sentences as a shared reading text.
  • Using an Elmo, display the book Friends are Fun from the My World Collection. Use pages 25 to discuss some ways that friends have fun together. Invite the students to share why the two activities are fun. This discussion requires the children to think about being a part of the activity and share ways they make the activity fun.
  • Provide paper and crayons for each child to draw pictures of an activity they share with a friend. Share the sentence frame "My friend’s name is ___. We ____ together" as a caption. Review the drawings and share them with the children to introduce session two of Friends Are Fun.  
  • Remind the children that today they have talked about how friends have fun playing together. On another day, they will look at how friends play and work together at school. Ask them to be thinking about what they might do to help make school a place where they can have fun working and playing together.

Book One, Session Two: FRIENDS ARE FUN

  • Begin the session by reviewing the class definitions of a friend. You can also share activities and drawings from the previous session. Remind them that the book is titled Friends Are Fun. The author wrote the first half of the book to help them understand the importance of friends, but the second half of her book shares another important reason for being a friend. Share the rest of the book using an Elmo. Examples of questions might include:

Pages 6 and 8:

  • Where are the children? What are they doing? How many children are in the picture? (There are three children seen easily and a fourth in the background.) What does that tell us about how the children have to work together if the activity is to be fun?
  • Where is the teacher? How does this affect the activity? What will happen if one child is not a good friend? Is there a possibility that one of the children is not being included in the activity?
  • What are some words to describe what good friends do in an activity like this? (share, take turns, work quietly, etc.) Write these words on the board and read them with the students as they discuss each.
  • On page 8, only two children are working together. What is necessary when two people work together? Which words on the board are examples of how they can be good friends?

Page 10:

  • Ask if being a good friend on the playground is much like working in the classroom. Why? What are some good things that friends must do if playing is to be fun?
  • Remind the children that you will be watching for examples of what good friends do in the classroom and playground. Tell them to do the same and that you will be asking them for examples of friendship they see. Before the next discussion of friendship, praise the class and individual students that you see as good examples. When the entire class works well, explain how they have helped others in the class and also helped you work with an individual child or a group of students. Say, "All of you found it easier to complete your work today because all of you worked together like good friends. Thanks!"

 This is the end of part one in this series of using leveled books to teach the importance of good citizenship and classroom behavior. Click here to see the next installment. You can subscribe to our blog in the upper right sidebar to get new posts delivered to your inbox.

~~~

Geraldine Haggard is the author of several books from our Kaleidoscope Collection. She spent 37 years in the Plano, TX school system. She currently tutors, chairs a committee that gifts books to low-income students, teaches in her church, and serves as a facilitator in a program for grieving children.

~~~

Click the left image below to download an information sheet with key features about the My World Series, which contains the book mentioned in this post. Click the right image below to download an information sheet with key features about the Kaleidoscope Collection, which includes books that Geraldine Haggard has authored.

My World Series Info Sheet                   Kaleidoscope Collection Info Sheet

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Topics: Leveled Readers, Reading Activities, My World, Geraldine Haggard, Behavioral Skills

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