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Using Level A Books to Teach Children How to Read, Part 2

Posted by Paula Dugger on Apr 11, 2017 3:28:00 PM

describe the imageThis post is the second in a series that documents guest blogger Paula Dugger's experience of teaching her grandson how to read with Level A books. To read the first post, click here

In my previous post, I prepared my grandson, Carter, with literacy exercises in preparation for his first Level A book. After using the Letter Buddies Magnetic Letters to teach Carter about the words “me” and “my,” it was time for me to introduce the Guided Reading Level A book, Cowboy. 

3) I explained that both the words “me” and “my” are used in the book. I asked Carter to show me the word “my” on the first six pages of text and “me” on the last page. We also went back and looked at the pictures to see if he could tell me what he saw in each of those photos. This exercise encouraged him to use the pictures for textual meaning.

 

4) Now, it was time to model reading the book. Using my fingers, I matched each printed word with the word I said aloud to show one-to-one matching (“My hat,” ”My boots,” etc.). Next, I asked Carter to help me by pointing to the words while we read together. Finally, I asked him to read the book by himself, making sure he was matching one-to-one by pointing. The first six pages of text are patterned, but the text changes on page 8 and there are two lines (“Me! I am a cowboy”). Cowboy_v4 (dragged).jpg

In the following days, I asked Carter to read the book, but he sometimes would not use his finger to match one-to-one and would insert words that weren’t in the text. I repeated many of the steps listed on the first day to provide support, eventually dropping some of the activities until Carter was able to pick up the book and read independently.

The scaffolding and procedures set up on the first day can be used to introduce any book. A great follow up book to Cowboy is another level A book in the Kaleidoscope Collection called My Birthday. It is also structured and patterned much like Cowboy. The first two pages are “My friends” and “My present.” I would introduce the book and ask, “What would you have at your birthday party?” and then have the child look at the pictures and tell me what s/he sees to confirm meaning. Then I would say that there is a word on the pages that he (Carter) already knows from his last book, Cowboy. I would ask him to find it by framing it with his fingers or sliding his finger under it and reading it slowly. The word “my” should be a known anchor word that can be recognized and read, which provides confidence when reading a new book.

Some very important things to remember when teaching a child to read include the following:

  • Reading is a skill that takes time to develop.
  • A child should spend a minimum of 20 minutes a day reading or having books read to them.
  • Allow the reader to read the same books over and over to increase fluency and quick recognition of familiar words. Re-reading also provides confidence.

Hameray Publishing provides a wide variety of titles written for the beginning reader, many of which are found in their Kaleidoscope Collection. Thirty new titles have recently been added at levels A and B, providing a great selection of titles for aspiring readers!

~~~

Paula Dugger has a B.S, M.Ed. and Reading Specialist Certification from The University of Texas at Austin and Reading Recovery training through Texas Woman’s University. A former first grade teacher, reading coordinator and Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Paula has served as an adjunct professor at Texas Woman’s University and Dallas Baptist University teaching reading classes for current and future teachers. She also does educational consulting and training through Dugger Educational Consulting, LLC, in addition to writing blogs and early literacy books for Hameray. She can be contacted at pdugger11@gmail.com 

Paula and her husband Neil have two married daughters and are grandparents to Carter, Blake, and Faye. She raises registered Texas Longhorns on the weekends. Her longhorn cattle are featured in her first book published by Hameray Publishing group, titled Longhorns. She has authored six additional titles in the Kaleidoscope Collection—Ben & Ruby, Buttons, Cowboy, Dinner, Going Up & Down, and Round, Not Round.

~~

For more information about the Kaleidoscope Collection, which features many Guided Reading Level A books, click hte image below.

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Topics: Early Childhood, Leveled Readers, Kaleidoscope Collection, Paula Dugger

Using Level A Books to Teach Children How to Read, Part 1

Posted by Paula Dugger on Apr 4, 2017 3:28:00 PM

describe the imageThis is a guest blog post series authored by Paula Dugger, M. Ed. Paul is an educational consultant who has previously served as a Reading Recovery Teacher/Teacher Leader, first grade teacher, Title I and high school reading teacher, and a Reading Coordinator. 

Recently, I had the opportunity to spend six days with my four year-old grandson, Carter. I thought that it was a great time for him to learn how to read. I was especially excited, as I had a copy of a brand new Guided Reading Level A book, Cowboy, that I recently wrote for the Hameray Kaleidoscope Collection. Best of all, this book features Carter on the cover and throughout the book.

 Choosing the appropriate leveled book is critical when introducing a child to reading. Guided Reading Leveled books A -C (Intervention Levels 1-3) are called early emergent readers. They are perfect for children who are learning the basic concepts of books and print awareness. Books at these levels contain the following features:
  • Controlled and limited text per page
  • Repetitive patterned vocabulary and text
  • Strong picture support for meaning
  • Familiar language and concepts
  • Large print and wide spacing

cowboy.jpgBefore I outline my teaching procedures, let me provide some information about Carter’s literacy background. His parents, who appreciate the importance of reading, have read to Carter almost every day since birth, and he has an ever-expanding library of books. He attends a preschool and has learned letter names and most corresponding sounds. He is also aware that his cool name contains the words car, cart, and art. All of the books read and re-read to him have helped build his speech, language and listening skills while expanding vocabulary, imagination, curiosity, and background knowledge. Carter is often seen picking up a book and “reading” based on what he has heard and remembers from being read to.

 

I felt that Carter was now ready for the next step in learning how to read. Here is how we first prepared to read Cowboy:

 

 

1). I began by using magnetic letters from Letter Buddies to display the words me and my. I took my finger and slid under each word and said slowly “me and then “my pointing out that they both started with the same sound and letter but ended with a different letter and sound. After my modeling, we did the task together and then Carter did this independently. I mixed up the letters and had him make each of the words, telling me what they said.

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2) Next, I had Carter write the two words, using the model that the magnetic letters provided. Afterwards, I asked him to read the two words, sliding his fingers under each to make sure he was looking at all the letters and making the correct sounds.

         dugg3.jpg           dugg4.jpg

Now, we were ready to start reading CowboyNext Tuesday, I'll share how to model reading with a Guided Reading Level A book. Make sure to subcribe to the Hameray blog in the right-hand bar to receive my next post in your inbox!

~~~

Paula Dugger has a B.S, M.Ed., and Reading Specialist Certification from The University of Texas at Austin and Reading Recovery training through Texas Woman’s University. A former first grade teacher, reading coordinator and Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Paula has served as an adjunct professor at Texas Woman’s University and Dallas Baptist University teaching reading classes for current and future teachers. She also does educational consulting and training through Dugger Educational Consulting, LLC, in addition to writing blogs and early literacy books for Hameray. She can be contacted at pdugger11@gmail.com

 

Paula and her husband Neil have two married daughters and are grandparents to Carter, Blake, and Faye. She raises registered Texas Longhorns on the weekends. Her longhorn cattle are featured in her first book published by Hameray Publishing group, Longhorns. She has authored six additional titles in the Kaleidoscope Collection—Ben & Ruby, Buttons, Cowboy, Dinner, Going Up and Down, and Round, Not Round.

 ~~~

For more information about the Kaleidoscope Collection, which features many Guided Reading Level A books, click hte image below.

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Topics: Early Childhood, Leveled Readers, Kaleidoscope Collection, Paula Dugger

[New Post] Using Mrs. Wishy-Washy Books to do a Character Analysis—with FREE Download!

Posted by Paula Dugger on Feb 19, 2016 10:42:33 AM

describe the imageThis is a guest blog post. It's authored by special guest blogger Paula Dugger, who is an educational consultant with a rich-literacy background that includes serving as a Reading Recovery Teacher/Teacher Leader, first grade teacher, Title I and high school reading teacher, as well as a Reading Coordinator.

 Mrs. Wishy-Washy has been a favorite of my mine as well as my students' for over twenty years. Joy Cowley has delighted young readers with simple text and fun stories through her endearing characters.

I created an activity that allows beginning readers to journal Mrs. Wishy-Washy through 21 books found in the Joy Cowley Early Birds Collection and Joy Cowley Collection. Not only do readers document their reading but they also analyze the main character beginning with level 3 titles and progressing to level 16.

Because this activity may take months to complete, I usually have students put their 2 sheets in a folder so that they can decorate the front with Mrs. Wishy-Washy and some of her friends. It also makes it easy for me to store them and pull for small group direct instruction. As the readers become more proficient and move to higher levels, the activity can be completed independently.

I hope your students enjoy this activity as much as mine do.

 

Mrs_Wishy-Washy_Journal.jpg

 

~~~

To download Paula's activity, or information sheets with key features about Joy Cowley's two series Joy Cowley Early Birds and the Joy Cowley Collection, which contain the books mentioned in this post, click the images below.

 

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Topics: Mrs. Wishy-Washy, Reading Activities, Paula Dugger, Guest Blog, Independent Reading

[New Post] The Importance of Reading 20 Minutes Per Day

Posted by Paula Dugger on Dec 22, 2015 3:30:00 PM

describe the imageThis is a guest blog post. It's authored by special guest blogger Paula Dugger, who is an educational consultant with a rich-literacy background that includes serving as a Reading Recovery Teacher/Teacher Leader, first grade teacher, Title I and high school reading teacher, as well as a Reading Coordinator. 

Why Reading Everyday Is Critical to Long Term Success

“There is more treasure in books than in all the pirate’s loot on Treasure Island.” — Walt Disney

Reading daily at home, as well as for long stretches at school, is critical to a child’s long-term success in school and in life. It is important to remember that books should be selected by the child and should not be too difficult to read. (For more information on the components of independent reading, see my recent blog, “5 Tips for Independent Reading in Your Classroom,” posted November 19, 2015.)

“Children are made readers on the laps of their parents.” — Emilie Buchwald

Reading aloud with children is known to be the single most important activity for building the knowledge and skills they will eventually require for learning to read.” — Marilyn Jager Adams

Parents are a child’s first teacher, and by the time the child turns one year of age they will have learned all the sounds needed to speak the language spoken in the home. But they have to hear that language! The more stories they hear read aloud, the more words they will be exposed to, and the better they will be able to talk.

Hearing words help to build a rich network of words in a baby’s brain. Kids whose parents frequently talk/read to them know more words by age 2 than children who have not been read to. And kids who are read to during their early years are likely to learn to read at the right time.” (Kidshealth.org, May 2013)

“Today a reader, tomorrow a leader.” — Margaret Fuller

“There is no substitute for books in the life of a child.” — Mary Ellen Chase

Investing as little as 20 minutes a day can be the difference in a lifetime of success or failure for a child. The table below representing Nagy and Herman’s (1987) research clearly emphasized the importance of reading at least 20 minutes per day.        

Screen_Shot_2015-12-22_at_4.39.56_PM.png

 

“A book is the most effective weapon against intolerance and ignorance.” — Lyndon Baines Johnson

“Reading is a basic tool in the living of a good life.” — Mortimer Adler

Did you know?

  • Many states project how many prison beds it will need by determining the number of students reading below level in 4th grade.
  • 60% of America’s prison inmates are illiterate.
  • 85% of juvenile offenders have reading problems
  • Children who have not developed some basic literacy skills by the time they enter school are 3–4 times more likely to drop out of school. (US Department of Education)

“Literacy is not a luxury, it is a right and a responsibility.” — Bill Clinton

“Too many of our children cannot read. Reading is the building block, and it must be the foundation for education reform.” — George W. Bush

 

Twenty minutes a day reading aloud to young children or listening to the child read is the key to academic success. Reading twenty minutes a day is a small investment of time that will create a life-long learner.

Reading is a discount ticket to everywhere.” — Mary Schmich

~~~

Paula Dugger has a B.S., M.Ed., and Reading Specialist Certification from The University of Texas at Austin and Reading Recovery training through Texas Woman’s University. Paula does educational consulting and training through Dugger Educational Consulting, LLC.

Paula and her husband Neil are parents to two wonderful daughters, Alicean and Ashley, two sons-in-law Kevin and Patrick, and grandparents Carter and Blake. She also raises registered Texas Longhorns on the weekends. The longhorn cattle are featured in her first book published by Hameray Publishing Group, titled Longhorns.

~~~

For more information on the Kaleidoscope Collection, in which Paula's book can be found, click here to visit our website or click the image to the left below to download an information sheet highlighting key features. To download the free log, click the image to the right.

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[New Post] 5 Tips for Independent Reading in Your Classroom—with FREE Download!

Posted by Paula Dugger on Nov 19, 2015 4:58:14 PM

describe the imageThis is a guest blog post. It's authored by special guest blogger Paula Dugger, who is an educational consultant with a rich-literacy background that includes serving as a Reading Recovery Teacher/Teacher Leader, first grade teacher, Title I and high school reading teacher, as well as a Reading Coordinator. 

While independent reading may seem like an easy skill, it is often very challenging for a beginning or struggling reader. Because of its strong correlation to academic success, most elementary schools have some type of independent reading time within the instructional day.

The many benefits of independent reading include fluency practice, vocabulary development, reading comprehension, and oral language development. In addition, reading opens up an endless bank of knowledge for students who read more. However, teachers need to utilize this time to monitor and record important information regarding the students’ reading behaviors that can lead to better instruction. 

“Independent reading” can be defined as any reading a reader does on his/her own by self-selecting a text which is of interest to the reader that can be read with little or no help at a high degree of accuracy. Some teachers mistakenly believe that this is a time when a reader reads alone silently without help in order to “read” or “practice” a teacher-selected text and not necessarily a text that can be read at an “independent” level of accuracy nor of interest to the reader.


So how do we teach and insure our students are reading independently every day?
I have personally used the following strategy, as well as trained teachers to use it daily in their classrooms. While this might seem only appropriate at the elementary level, it is also vitally important all the way through high school.

Independent_Reading_Data_Form_PDF-300-1.jpg1. Begin by scheduling a time for independent reading. You might want to start out with 5 minutes and progress in increments of 3- 5 minutes until you have reached a desired time of 20 minutes or more.

2. In order to monitor each reader, I have created a form (shown to the right) with the names of all my students so that I can record information on as many of them as possible each day. You can download this form at the bottom of this page.

3. I almost always have time to listen to each student read several pages since these texts are supposed to be at the easy or independent level.

4. I can ask comprehension questions if I feel a need to and/or can record information that might help me with each individual reader.

5. Have all students read aloud at the same time during the allotted time, while the teacher moves around the room listening in on readers. This gives the teacher not only the opportunity to hear every student read, but to also do any explicit teaching and modeling needed on components such as how fluent and phrased reading should sound.

It is often the teacher who is at first most resistant to having everyone read out loud, thinking that the students will not be able to focus on their own reading. However, if everyone is reading out loud, the teacher will know if the students are actually reading. Silent reading can easily be “faked.” If I want my students to read more, I need to hear them. In this day and age, very few students have the luxury of reading in a quiet place, especially when at home or in a public place. So, it is ok for classrooms to be filled with readers engaged in oral reading!

Once the students begin reading, I can visually see and hear everyone reading. This allows me to move around monitoring with confidence that everyone is engaged in learning. A bonus comes in knowing that I have listened to most, if not all, of my students read orally each day.

Try these tips and be amazed at how confident your students will become in reading!

~~~

Paula Dugger has a B.S., M.Ed., and Reading Specialist Certification from The University of Texas at Austin and Reading Recovery training through Texas Woman’s University. Paula does educational consulting and training through Dugger Educational Consulting, LLC.

Paula and her husband Neil are parents to two wonderful daughters, Alicean and Ashley, two sons-in-law Kevin and Patrick, and grandparents Carter and Blake. She also raises registered Texas Longhorns on the weekends. The longhorn cattle are featured in her first book published by Hameray Publishing Group, titled Longhorns.

~~~

For more information on the Kaleidoscope Collection, in which Paula's book can be found, click here to visit our website or click the image to the left below to download an information sheet highlighting key features. To download the free log, click the image to the right.

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Magnetic Letters & Cognitive Development: Teaching Colors, Part 1

Posted by Paula Dugger on Jun 23, 2015 4:00:55 PM

Paula brightThis is the first in a progressive series of posts by special guest blogger Paula Dugger that first ran in 2013 on ways to use magnetic letters for cognitive development and the early stages of literacy. You can see the rest of the posts in the series by clicking these links: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10.

Magnetic Letters and Cognitive Development

Activities using magnetic letters can help in cognitive development both consciously and unconsciously in young children. The letters are colorful, three-dimensional, and they lend themselves to movement and touch. Letters are a part of the print we see around us in the world. Using soft foam letters (Hameray offers a great set of uppercase and lowercase foam letters), children can learn many skills:

                  -To categorize by sorting, matching, and classifying

                  -To differentiate colors, shapes, and letters

                  -The concept of letters by name, sight, shape, and sound

                  -The concept of words by sight or by putting together sounds to form words

My series of guest blogs will be on specific activities that use magnetic letters to help with the cognitive development of preschoolers. No activity should exceed five to ten minutes depending upon the age, ability, and interest of the child. These activities should be seen as fun games, and each will be a little more rigorous than the one before. The blogs will be divided into four groups:

                  -Teaching colors

                  -Teaching similarities and differences (or comparing and contrasting)

                  -Teaching the alphabet (letter names)

                  -Word analysis (making words)

 

Lesson #1: Teaching Colors

Colors are among the first ways young children make distinctions between things in the world. Color words are also some of the first words used to describe things. Whenever you introduce a task, make sure the child understands what to do. Below is a great framework that demonstrates how to scaffold an activity by modeling and gradually releasing the activity to the child.

I do, you watch   →

I do, you help  ↓

 

↑ You do, I watch

←You do, I help

 

Materials used in this Activity: Lowercase Foam Magnetic Letters and Magnetic Whiteboard

MagneticLetters

 

 

 

 

 

Activity 1: Sorting letters of the same color

The teacher or parent’s language will be important in these activities for defining the color names and developing oral language. Place ten to fifteen different letters of various colors out
for the child to see.

Color Chart Magnetic Letters

- Paula Dugger

Paula Dugger has a B.S., M.Ed. and Reading Specialist Certification from The University of Texas at Austin and Reading Recovery training through Texas Woman’s University. Paula does educational consulting and training through Dugger Educational Consulting, LLC and can be contacted at np.dugger@att.net

Paula and her husband Neil are parents to two wonderful daughters, Alicean and Ashley, two son-in-laws Kevin and Patrick, and grandparents to Carter. She also raises registered Texas Longhorns on the weekends. The longhorn cattle are featured in her first book published by Hameray Publishing Group, titled Longhorns.

If you'd like to order some magnetic foam letters to try out this activity for yourself, you can find them on the Hameray website. If you're teaching at this stage of literacy, you might also be interested in the Letter Buddies books. Click on the images below to see some key features of the series!

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The Power of the Cut-Up Sentence

Posted by Paula Dugger on Feb 10, 2015 8:00:00 AM

describe the imageThis is a guest blog post. It's authored by special guest blogger Paula Dugger, who is an educational consultant with a rich-literacy background that includes serving as a Reading Recovery Teacher/Teacher Leader, first grade teacher, Title I and high school reading teacher, as well as a Reading Coordinator. Hameray is thrilled to be able to share with you Paula's classroom-tested ideas and experience in helping young learners achieve their early literacy goals.

As a Reading Recovery teacher, I was always amazed at the interest by regular classroom teachers concerning the cut-up sentence activity seen in a Reading Recovery lesson.  Whenever an opportunity permitted, classroom teachers would be invited to observe their Reading Recovery student(s) during a lesson.  After each lesson, I would ask the teachers if they noticed any behaviors the student was exhibiting in the lesson but not in their classroom.  I would also ask if there was anything in the lesson they would like more information on or like to incorporate within their class or small groups. 

Almost without exception, the cut-up sentence was always brought up. The sequencing of words to create a meaningful thought along with searching for visual information is powerful for such a simple activity.  I also used the cut-up to work on phrasing and fluency.  Many teachers found this to be a great way to explicitly teach phrasing and fluent reading.

 

So how does this activity work?

PaulaDugger1

During the writing portion of the Reading Recovery lesson, the child is asked to compose a story (one or two sentences).  The teacher will assist the child as needed.

PaulaDugger22

 The teacher then writes the sentence on a piece of tag board while child watches.

PaulaDugger3

Next, the teacher would cut the sentence up(usually word by word) while the child watches.

PaulaDugger4

After the teacher scrambles the words, the child reassembles the sentence.  

PaulaDugger5

The sentence is then placed in an envelope with the sentence written (by the teacher) on the outside.

PaulaDugger6

The student can then take the sentence home to reassemble the sentence for practice and to rewrite in order to accumulate more words into their writing vocabulary.  The envelope with the sentence written on the outside serves as a way for the child or parent to check after the sentence has been reassembled.

 The cut-up sentence allows the teacher an opportunity to teach and the child to practice:

  • one-to-one correspondence between the printed and spoken word
  • thinking about the sounds in words
  • sequencing words using structure so that they make a meaningful sentence
  • searching and checking for information by rereading
  • using capitalization, punctuation, and spacing
  • phrasing and fluent reading
  • physically manipulating words
  • self--correcting

 

As the child moves up into more complex reading levels, the sentences will also become more complex.   The teacher can also prompt the student to reassemble the sentence into phrases to explicitly teach how to read phrased and fluently.

In a small group setting the teacher and students can compose a sentence together.  Instead of sending the sentence home, the sentences be saved in a place for the group to use over and over by the students.

It is important that the teacher carefully model the assignment and guide the student.  Once the child has demonstrated an understanding of the task, putting the sentence back together can easily be an independent activity in the classroom as well as a shared activity with parents at home.

 

~~~

Paula Dugger has a B.S., M.Ed., and Reading Specialist Certification from The University of Texas at Austin and Reading Recovery training through Texas Woman’s University. Paula does educational consulting and training through Dugger Educational Consulting, LLC and can be contacted at np.dugger@att.net

Paula and her husband Neil are parents to two wonderful daughters, Alicean and Ashley, two sons-in-law Kevin and Patrick, and grandparents Carter and Blake. She also raises registered Texas Longhorns on the weekends. The longhorn cattle are featured in her first book published by Hameray Publishing Group, titled Longhorns.

 

For more blogs by Paula click HERE.

 

 

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Topics: Early Childhood, Paula Dugger, Guest Blog

Using Formulas To Give Powerful Book Introductions

Posted by Paula Dugger on Jan 22, 2015 8:00:00 AM

describe the imageThis is a guest blog post. It's authored by special guest blogger Paula Dugger, who is an educational consultant with a rich-literacy background that includes serving as a Reading Recovery Teacher/Teacher Leader, first grade teacher, Title I and high school reading teacher, as well as a Reading Coordinator. Hameray is thrilled to be able to share with you Paula's classroom-tested ideas and experience in helping young learners achieve their early literacy goals.

A well-planned book introduction that considers the strengths and weaknesses of the reader(s) will help ensure a good first reading of a new text by the reader(s). However, no one-book introduction “fits all” and the teacher should plan each introduction carefully to meet the needs of the reader(s).

 
I use the simple formula of M(eaning) S(tructure) V(isual) to help design a book introduction for each group of students or individual student I am working with.

Using meaning, structure and visual information in the introduction of an appropriately leveled and selected text will help ensure a good first reading by the child.

 

  • M-meaning (give an overview of the story). The reader needs to know what the story is about before reading. Adults only choose books after recommendations or reading a review of the book.
  • S-structure (review any difficult or predicted trouble spot with the student).  The beginning and emergent reader does not have command of all the various sentence structures in their oral language and will need help in developing various language structures. This element of the book introduction is also vital in helping second language learners.
  • V-visual (have the student locate 1 or 2 known or unknown words prior to reading) Helping a reader locate an unknown word throughout a new text as an anchor often helps in confidence building in tackling a new text.  The same is true when asking the reader to locate a new word based on visual information.

Below is a sample book introduction using Joy Cowley’s

Wishy-Washy Garden 

M

 

Dugger-11-300

 

 

“Today we are going to read Wishy-Washy Garden by Joy Cowley.  In this story, the animals want to help Mrs. Wishy-Washy, so they clean her garden.”

 

 S

 

Screen_Shot_2015-01-21_at_3.58.23_PM

 

 

Texts with patterned phrases can be addressed through structure.  To highlight or plant a specific phrase structure into the child’s mind, the teacher might say while pointing to the pictures, “Let’s look at the pictures to see who will help. The (cow) will help. The (pig) will help, etc.

 

 

S

 Screen_Shot_2015-01-21_at_3.58.39_PM

 

 


The predicable text pattern changes on the last page. The teacher might say, “Mrs. Wishy-Washy cried, ‘Where is my garden?’  Can you say ‘Where is my garden?’  Say it again like you think she would say that.”

V

Screen_Shot_2015-01-21_at_3.58.51_PM


 

 


To help students use visual information on a potential unknown word, the teacher could say, “On page 2 it says the cow ‘will help clean the garden’. What do you think clean would start with?  Can you find a word that starts with that letter (or letters) on this page and frame it so that I can see that you found it?”

“Now can you find the word clean on page 6?  On page 7? When you read the story you will now be able to read the word clean because it begins with the and makes sense in the story.”

 

 

 

After the book introduction using MSV have the reader(s) attempt a first reading on their own with the teacher silent. If needed the teacher can read with the students in a choral reading for a second reading.

 

Hameray books often have a brief introduction on the back of the book.

Screen_Shot_2015-01-21_at_4.10.38_PM

The inside back cover also contains ideas for before, during and after reading.

Screen_Shot_2015-01-21_at_4.11.21_PM

~~~

Paula Dugger has a B.S., M.Ed., and Reading Specialist Certification from The University of Texas at Austin and Reading Recovery training through Texas Woman’s University. Paula does educational consulting and training through Dugger Educational Consulting, LLC and can be contacted at np.dugger@att.net

Paula and her husband Neil are parents to two wonderful daughters, Alicean and Ashley, two sons-in-law Kevin and Patrick, and grandparents to Carter. She also raises registered Texas Longhorns on the weekends. The longhorn cattle are featured in her first book published by Hameray Publishing Group, titled Longhorns.

 

For more information on Joy Cowley Early Birds books cick the image below

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Using Magnetic Letters to Make Words, Part 2

Posted by Paula Dugger on Jul 25, 2013 8:00:00 AM

describe the imageThis is the tenth and last of a progressive series of posts that we will be featuring on the Hameray Blog every Thursday for 10 weeks (for the other posts, click here). It's authored by special guest blogger Paula Dugger, who is an educational consultant with a rich-literacy background that includes serving as a Reading Recovery Teacher/Teacher Leader, first grade teacher, Title I and high school reading teacher, as well as a Reading Coordinator. Hameray is thrilled to be able to share with you Paula's classroom-tested ideas and experience in helping young learners achieve their early literacy goals.

Magnetic Letters and Cognitive Development

Activities using magnetic letters can help in cognitive development both consciously and unconsciously in young children. The letters are colorful, three-dimensional, and they lend themselves to movement and touch. Letters are a part of the print we see around us in the world. Using soft foam letters (Hameray offers a great set of uppercase and lowercase foam letters), children can learn many skills:

                  -To categorize by sorting, matching, and classifying

                  -To differentiate colors, shapes, and letters

                  -The concept of letters by name, sight, shape, and sound

                  -The concept of words by sight or by putting together sounds to form words

As previously mentioned, my series of guest blogs is on specific activities that use magnetic letters to help with the cognitive development of preschoolers. No activity should exceed five to ten minutes depending upon the age, ability, and interest of the child. These activities should be seen as fun games, and each will be a little more rigorous than the one before. The blogs will be divided into four groups:

                  -Teaching colors

                  -Teaching similarities and differences (or comparing and contrasting)

                  -Teaching the alphabet (letter names)

                  -Word analysis (making words)

 

Using Magnetic Letters to Make Words

Once a child has become familiar with recognizing letters by name and even forming letters, it is time to introduce the concept of words. Putting together letters in a certain order will produce a word. Words are everywhere. The objective of this blog post and the previous one is to help the child learn familiar words such as their name by using magnetic letters. This activity will help the child to form words that s/he can easily read and write. Having a set of core words that s/he can read and write will help set the stage for success once formal schooling begins. Whenever introducing a task, make sure the child understands what s/he is to do. A great framework is listed below that demonstrates how to scaffold an activity by modeling and gradually releasing the activity to the child.   

I do, you watch     →

I do, you help   ↓

 

↑  You do, I watch

←You do, I help

 

Materials used in this Activity: Foam Magnetic Letters and Magnetic Whiteboard MagneticLetters

 

 

 

 

 

 

Activity #10: Unscrambling Letters to Make Words, Part 2

If the activities listed in last blog (Activity #9) were completed successfully, the activities that follow will help determine what the child can do independently. Please see the last blog for more information.

10 1

Start this activity by providing the child with letters or word s/he may know such as his/her name. Scramble the letters and ask the child to make specific word(s).

10 2

If the letters are to form Carter’s name, then say, “Can you unscramble the letters and make your name?”

describe the image 10 4

Continue with additional words, being careful in the beginning to provide only the letters needed to correctly spell the word.

10 5

The next step to make the activity a little more rigorous would be to provide letters that can be for two or three words. Then ask the child to find the letters to make a specific word. For example, place c, m, a, o, m, and t out.

10 6

Then ask, “Can you make the word mom?”

10 7 10 8

Next say, “Can you make the word at or cat?” and so on.

The most rigorous activity would be to use (for example) the same letters in the activity above, but say, “Can you find some letters to make a word you know?” Asking the child to generate a word from a group of letters is a very high-level cognitive activity.

Children love to learn, and learning can be made fun in many ways. I hope the ideas presented in these blog posts using magnetic letters—along with immersing your child in literacy by reading daily and presenting opportunities to write—will help set him or her child on a successful journey to learning.

This was the tenth and last activity in the series. If you'd like to see the earlier lessons, click here!

- Paula Dugger

~~~

Paula Dugger has a B.S., M.Ed., and Reading Specialist Certification from The University of Texas at Austin and Reading Recovery training through Texas Woman’s University. Paula does educational consulting and training through Dugger Educational Consulting, LLC and can be contacted at np.dugger@att.net

Paula and her husband Neil are parents to two wonderful daughters, Alicean and Ashley, two sons-in-law Kevin and Patrick, and grandparents to Carter. She also raises registered Texas Longhorns on the weekends. The longhorn cattle are featured in her first book published by Hameray Publishing Group, titled Longhorns.

If you'd like to order some magnetic foam letters to try out this activity for yourself, you can find them on the Hameray website. If you're teaching at this stage of literacy, you might also be interested in the Letter Buddies books. Click on the images below to see some key features of the series!

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Topics: Letter Buddies, Early Childhood, Paula Dugger, Guest Blog

Using Magnetic Letters to Make Words, Part 1

Posted by Paula Dugger on Jul 18, 2013 8:00:00 AM

describe the imageThis is the ninth of a progressive series of posts that we will be featuring on the Hameray Blog every Thursday for 10 weeks (for the other posts, click here). It's authored by special guest blogger Paula Dugger, who is an educational consultant with a rich-literacy background that includes serving as a Reading Recovery Teacher/Teacher Leader, first grade teacher, Title I and high school reading teacher, as well as a Reading Coordinator. Hameray is thrilled to be able to share with you Paula's classroom-tested ideas and experience in helping young learners achieve their early literacy goals.

Magnetic Letters and Cognitive Development

Activities using magnetic letters can help in cognitive development both consciously and unconsciously in young children. The letters are colorful, three-dimensional, and they lend themselves to movement and touch. Letters are a part of the print we see around us in the world. Using soft foam letters (Hameray offers a great set of uppercase and lowercase foam letters), children can learn many skills:

                  -To categorize by sorting, matching, and classifying

                  -To differentiate colors, shapes, and letters

                  -The concept of letters by name, sight, shape, and sound

                  -The concept of words by sight or by putting together sounds to form words

As previously mentioned, my series of guest blogs is on specific activities that use magnetic letters to help with the cognitive development of preschoolers. No activity should exceed five to ten minutes depending upon the age, ability, and interest of the child. These activities should be seen as fun games, and each will be a little more rigorous than the one before. The blogs will be divided into four groups:

                  -Teaching colors

                  -Teaching similarities and differences (or comparing and contrasting)

                  -Teaching the alphabet (letter names)

                  -Word analysis (making words)

 

Using Magnetic Letters to Make Words

Once a child has become familiar with recognizing letters by name and even forming letters, it is time to introduce the concept of words. Putting together letters in a certain order will produce a word. Words are everywhere. The objective of this blog post and the next one is to help the child learn familiar words such as their name by using magnetic letters. This activity will help the child to form words that s/he can easily read and write. Having a set of core words that s/he can read and write will help set the stage for success once formal schooling begins. Whenever introducing a task, make sure the child understands what s/he is to do. A great framework is listed below that demonstrates how to scaffold an activity by modeling and gradually releasing the activity to the child.   

I do, you watch     →

I do, you help   ↓

 

↑  You do, I watch

←You do, I help

 

 

Materials used in this Activity: Foam Magnetic Letters and Magnetic Whiteboard MagneticLetters

 

 

 

 

 

 

Activity #9: Unscrambling Letters to Make Words, Part 1

9 1 9 2

Begin this activity by either writing the child’s name (or targeted word) as a model or using magnetic letters as a model.

9 3 9 4

Then place in random order the letters of the child’s name and ask him/her to make his/her name just like shown in your model. Make sure to use the lowercase letters with only the uppercase to begin a name or proper noun. Using all upper case letters will create problems down the line, especially in school when the correct form will be required. It is better to learn correctly in the beginning, as it is not always easy to undo learning.

9 5

For Carter’s name, I would place each letter in random order and say while pointing to the model, “Here is your name, Carter.” Can you make your name with these letters just like I did?

9 6 9 7 9 8

If the child’s name has another word embedded in his name, I would use it as the next word, such as car and cart which appear in Carter’s name. I might say, “Carter, your name has the word car in it. See it here. Can you make the word car? Your name also has the word cart in it. Can you make the word like I have underlined?” Having a link from his/her name to other words will provide a fun opportunity to learn other words.

9 9 9 10

Of course, not all names have words embedded in them, so you might select new but familiar words like mom, dad, cat or any short word that will have some meaning to the child.

9 11 9 12

I would not attempt to teach more than one or two words at a time. When coming back to the activity after some time away, always start with the “known” words to see if the child truly has learned the words. Try having the child unscramble the letters without the model if you think the child can successfully complete the task without it. If assistance is needed, then provide the model.

Ultimately, the child should be able to unscramble the letters to form previously introduced words without assistance or a model. Letting the child have many opportunities to practice writing the words and locating words in print will also help in learning. The child should be able to form, read, and write the word to have it mastered. It often takes many opportunities and encounters with specific words for most children to learn words and to recognize, read, or write them automatically. Be patient and do not attempt to introduce too many words at once.

Listed below are some suggestions of high-frequency words that you might want to introduce once you exhaust familiar words such as the child’s first and last names, family names, and color and number words.

mom

dad

cat

dog

I

a

can

see

me

no

go

like

look

is

it

my

and

to

the

am

 

9 13 9 14 9 15

A fun independent activity is to provide letters for specific words and, using a model, form the words with the magnetic letters. A great source of words found in print with an accompanying picture can be found in the Hameray Letter Buddies series.

This was the ninth activity in the series. If you'd like to see the other lessons, click here!

- Paula Dugger

~~~

Paula Dugger has a B.S., M.Ed., and Reading Specialist Certification from The University of Texas at Austin and Reading Recovery training through Texas Woman’s University. Paula does educational consulting and training through Dugger Educational Consulting, LLC and can be contacted at np.dugger@att.net

Paula and her husband Neil are parents to two wonderful daughters, Alicean and Ashley, two sons-in-law Kevin and Patrick, and grandparents to Carter. She also raises registered Texas Longhorns on the weekends. The longhorn cattle are featured in her first book published by Hameray Publishing Group, titled Longhorns.

If you'd like to order some magnetic foam letters to try out this activity for yourself, you can find them on the Hameray website. If you're teaching at this stage of literacy, you might also be interested in the Letter Buddies books. Click on the images below to see some key features of the series!

New Call-to-Action New Call-to-Action

Read More

Topics: Letter Buddies, Early Childhood, Paula Dugger, Guest Blog

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